Document Detail


A randomized trial of sugar-sweetened beverages and adolescent body weight.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22998339     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages may cause excessive weight gain. We aimed to assess the effect on weight gain of an intervention that included the provision of noncaloric beverages at home for overweight and obese adolescents.
METHODS: We randomly assigned 224 overweight and obese adolescents who regularly consumed sugar-sweetened beverages to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received a 1-year intervention designed to decrease consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, with follow-up for an additional year without intervention. We hypothesized that the experimental group would gain weight at a slower rate than the control group.
RESULTS: Retention rates were 97% at 1 year and 93% at 2 years. Reported consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages was similar at baseline in the experimental and control groups (1.7 servings per day), declined to nearly 0 in the experimental group at 1 year, and remained lower in the experimental group than in the control group at 2 years. The primary outcome, the change in mean body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) at 2 years, did not differ significantly between the two groups (change in experimental group minus change in control group, -0.3; P=0.46). At 1 year, however, there were significant between-group differences for changes in BMI (-0.57, P=0.045) and weight (-1.9 kg, P=0.04). We found evidence of effect modification according to ethnic group at 1 year (P=0.04) and 2 years (P=0.01). In a prespecified analysis according to ethnic group, among Hispanic participants (27 in the experimental group and 19 in the control group), there was a significant between-group difference in the change in BMI at 1 year (-1.79, P=0.007) and 2 years (-2.35, P=0.01), but not among non-Hispanic participants (P>0.35 at years 1 and 2). The change in body fat as a percentage of total weight did not differ significantly between groups at 2 years (-0.5%, P=0.40). There were no adverse events related to study participation.
CONCLUSIONS: Among overweight and obese adolescents, the increase in BMI was smaller in the experimental group than in the control group after a 1-year intervention designed to reduce consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, but not at the 2-year follow-up (the prespecified primary outcome). (Funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00381160.).
Authors:
Cara B Ebbeling; Henry A Feldman; Virginia R Chomitz; Tracy A Antonelli; Steven L Gortmaker; Stavroula K Osganian; David S Ludwig
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.     Date:  2012-09-21
Journal Detail:
Title:  The New England journal of medicine     Volume:  367     ISSN:  1533-4406     ISO Abbreviation:  N. Engl. J. Med.     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-11     Completed Date:  2012-10-23     Revised Date:  2013-07-11    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0255562     Medline TA:  N Engl J Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1407-16     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.
Data Bank Information
Bank Name/Acc. No.:
ClinicalTrials.gov/NCT00381160
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Beverages / utilization*
Body Mass Index
Dietary Sucrose*
Energy Intake
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Obesity / diet therapy
Overweight / diet therapy*
Weight Gain*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
1U48DP001946/DP/NCCDPHP CDC HHS; HD30780/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; K24 DK082730/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K24DK082730/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; M01RR02172/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; R01 DK073025/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01DK073025/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; UL1 RR025758/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; UL1RR025758/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dietary Sucrose
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
N Engl J Med. 2013 Jan 17;368(3):286   [PMID:  23323910 ]
N Engl J Med. 2013 Jan 17;368(3):285-6   [PMID:  23323909 ]
Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2012 Dec;8(12):696   [PMID:  23044800 ]
N Engl J Med. 2013 Jan 17;368(3):287   [PMID:  23330174 ]
N Engl J Med. 2012 Oct 11;367(15):1462-3   [PMID:  22998341 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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