Document Detail


Racial and ethnic differences in determinants of intrauterine growth retardation and other compromised birth outcomes.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9431287     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVES: This study examined the extent of variation by race/ethnicity in the prevalence of adverse birth outcomes, whether differentials persisted after other risk factors were controlled for, and whether the direction and magnitude of relationships differed by type of outcome. METHODS: A revised system of measurement was used to estimate multinomial logistic models in a large, nationally representative US data set. RESULTS: Considerable racial/ethnic variation was found across birth outcome categories; differences persisted in the adjusted parameter estimates; and the effects of other risk factors on birth outcomes were similar as to direction, but varied somewhat in magnitude. The odds of compromised birth outcomes were much higher among African Americans than among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to persistent racial inequality, we found strong adverse effects of both inadequate and "adequate-plus" prenatal care and smoking. Risk of intrauterine growth retardation was higher in the absence of medical insurance, and risk of all adverse birth outcomes was lower among mothers participating in the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children.
Authors:
W P Frisbie; M Biegler; P de Turk; D Forbes; S G Pullum
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of public health     Volume:  87     ISSN:  0090-0036     ISO Abbreviation:  Am J Public Health     Publication Date:  1997 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1998-02-03     Completed Date:  1998-02-03     Revised Date:  2009-11-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  1254074     Medline TA:  Am J Public Health     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1977-83     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Population Research Center, University of Texas at Austin 78712, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans* / statistics & numerical data
European Continental Ancestry Group* / statistics & numerical data
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation / ethnology*,  genetics
Hispanic Americans*
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Odds Ratio
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome / ethnology*,  genetics
Prenatal Care
Prevalence
Residence Characteristics
Risk Factors
Smoking / ethnology
Socioeconomic Factors
United States / epidemiology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01-HD32330/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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