Document Detail


Racial disparities in birth outcomes increase with maternal age: recent data from North Carolina.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16550987     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Racial disparities in birth outcomes persist in North Carolina and the United States. We examined patterns of birth outcomes and womens health measures in North Carolina by race and age to portray the largest disparities. We wanted to see if our data were consistent with the "weathering hypothesis," which holds that the health of African American women may begin to deteriorate in early adulthood, with negative effects on birth outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive analysis of 1999-2003 North Carolina live birth and infant death records and 2001-2003 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey data. Birth outcome measures examined were low birth weight, very low birth weight, infant mortality neonatal mortality and postneonatal mortality. Womens health measures examined were obesity self-reported health status, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, current smoking, and smoking during pregnancy. Rates for whites and African Americans were compared for each of three age groups. RESULTS: Racial disparities in birth outcomes increase with increasing maternal age. African American teens often experience better birth outcomes than older African American women. Racial disparities in measures of womens health also increase with increasing age. CONCLUSIONS: Health problems among older African American women of reproductive age may contribute substantially to racial disparities in birth outcomes. Improving the health of older African American women may be an effective strategy to reduce the overall racial disparities in birth outcomes.
Authors:
Paul A Buescher; Manjoo Mittal
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  North Carolina medical journal     Volume:  67     ISSN:  0029-2559     ISO Abbreviation:  N C Med J     Publication Date:    2006 Jan-Feb
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2006-03-22     Completed Date:  2006-05-04     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  2984805R     Medline TA:  N C Med J     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  16-20     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
State Center for Health Statistics, North Carolina Division of Public Health, USA. paul.buescher@ncmail.net
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
African Americans / psychology,  statistics & numerical data*
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
European Continental Ancestry Group / psychology,  statistics & numerical data*
Female
Health Behavior / ethnology*
Humans
Infant Mortality / trends*
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Maternal Age*
Maternal Health Services / utilization
Middle Aged
North Carolina / epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Outcome / ethnology*
Risk Factors
Socioeconomic Factors

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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