Document Detail


Race, gender, and social status as modifiers of the effects of PM10 on mortality.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10824299     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Interest has recently been focused on which populations are most at risk of premature mortality induced by air pollution. This coincides with greater concern about environmental justice. We analyzed total mortality in the four largest US cities with daily measurements of particulate matter less than 10 microns (PM10) and combined the results to determine whether race, sex, and education are potential modifiers of the effects of PM10 on mortality. We computed daily counts of deaths stratified by sex, race, and education in each city and investigated their associations with PM10 in a Poisson regression model. We combined the results by using inverse variance weighted averages. We found evidence of effect modification by sex, with the slope in female deaths one third larger than in male deaths, whereas for social factors and race we found only weak evidence of effect modification. In general, the effect modification appeared modest compared with other reports of substantial effect modification by medical conditions.
Authors:
A Zanobetti; J Schwartz
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine     Volume:  42     ISSN:  1076-2752     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Occup. Environ. Med.     Publication Date:  2000 May 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-08-30     Completed Date:  2000-08-30     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9504688     Medline TA:  J Occup Environ Med     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  469-74     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Mass. 02115, USA. azanob@sparc6a.harvard.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Air Pollution*
Continental Population Groups
Dust
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Male
Mortality*
Poisson Distribution
Sex Factors
Social Class*
United States
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
ES 07410/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Dust

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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