Document Detail


Race, ancestry, and development of food-allergen sensitization in early childhood.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21890831     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: We examined whether the risk of food-allergen sensitization varied according to self-identified race or genetic ancestry.
METHODS: We studied 1104 children (mean age: 2.7 years) from an urban multiethnic birth cohort. Food sensitization was defined as specific immunoglobulin E (sIgE) levels of ≥ 0.35 kilo-units of allergen (kUA)/L for any of 8 common food allergens. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the associations of self-identified race and genetic ancestry with food sensitization. Analyses also examined associations with numbers of food sensitizations (0, 1 or 2, and ≥ 3 foods) and with logarithmically transformed allergen sIgE levels.
RESULTS: In this predominantly minority cohort (60.9% black and 22.5% Hispanic), 35.5% of subjects exhibited food sensitizations. In multivariate models, both self-reported black race (odds ratio [OR]: 2.34 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-4.44]) and African ancestry (in 10% increments; OR: 1.07 [95% CI: 1.02-1.14]) were associated with food sensitization. Self-reported black race (OR: 3.76 [95% CI: 1.09-12.97]) and African ancestry (OR: 1.19 [95% CI: 1.07-1.32]) were associated with a high number (≥ 3) of food sensitizations. African ancestry was associated with increased odds of peanut sIgE levels of ≥ 5 kUA/L (OR: 1.25 [95% CI: 1.01-1.52]). Similar ancestry associations were seen for egg sIgE levels of ≥ 2 kUA/L (OR: 1.13 [95% CI: 1.01-1.27]) and milk sIgE levels of ≥ 5 kUA/L (OR: 1.24 [95% CI: 0.94-1.63]), although findings were not significant for milk.
CONCLUSIONS: Black children were more likely to be sensitized to food allergens and were sensitized to more foods. African ancestry was associated with peanut sensitization.
Authors:
Rajesh Kumar; Hui-Ju Tsai; Xiumei Hong; Xin Liu; Guoying Wang; Colleen Pearson; Katherin Ortiz; Melanie Fu; Jacqueline A Pongracic; Howard Bauchner; Xiaobin Wang
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2011-09-02
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  128     ISSN:  1098-4275     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  2011 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-10-03     Completed Date:  2011-11-30     Revised Date:  2013-06-27    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e821-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
aDivision of Allergy and Immunology, Children’s Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60614, USA. rkumar@childrensmemorial.org
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
African Americans*
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group*
Female
Food Hypersensitivity / blood,  ethnology*,  genetics*,  immunology
Genotype
Health Status Disparities*
Hispanic Americans*
Humans
Immunoglobulin E / blood
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Self Report
Urban Health / statistics & numerical data
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K23HL093023/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; KL2RR025740/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; R01HD041702/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R21AI079872/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; R21AI087888/AI/NIAID NIH HHS; R21ES011666/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; U01AI090727,/AI/NIAID NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
37341-29-0/Immunoglobulin E
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Statistical uncertainty of mortality rates and rankings for children's hospitals.
Next Document:  Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants Employed by General and Subspecialty Pediatricians.