Document Detail


Quality-of-life measurements versus disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20586000     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic disease affecting the physical, social, and psychological well-being of patients. Different instruments have been developed to measure health-related quality of life, some of which are SLE-specific. Contributors to poor quality of life in patients with SLE include fatigue, fibromyalgia, depression, and cognitive dysfunction. Health-related quality of life is not strongly associated with disease activity or organ damage. The Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 is the most common instrument used to measure quality of life in SLE.
Authors:
Adnan N Kiani; Michelle Petri
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Current rheumatology reports     Volume:  12     ISSN:  1534-6307     ISO Abbreviation:  Curr Rheumatol Rep     Publication Date:  2010 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-07-13     Completed Date:  2010-10-19     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100888970     Medline TA:  Curr Rheumatol Rep     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  250-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1830 East Monument Street, Suite 7500, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA. akiani2@jhmi.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Chronic Disease
Health Status
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic / physiopathology*,  psychology*
Quality of Life*
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AR 43727/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; UL1 RR 025005/RR/NCRR NIH HHS

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