Document Detail


The quagga mussel crisis at Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Nevada (U.S.A.).
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20337691     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Parks are cornerstones of conservation; and non-native invasive species drive extensive changes to biological diversity in parks. Knowing this, national park staff at Lake Mead National Recreation Area in the southwestern United States had a program in place for early detection of the non-native, invasive quagga mussel (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis). Upon finding the mussel in January 2007, managers moved quickly to access funding and the best available science to implement a response. Managers considered four options--doing nothing, closing the park, restricting movement on the lakes, and educating and enforcing park visitors--and decided to focus on education and enforcing existing laws. Nonetheless, quagga spread throughout the park and soon began to appear throughout the western United States. I examined why efforts to control the expansion failed and determined the general lessons to be learned from this case. Concentrating human visitation on the lakes through land-use zoning opened a pathway for invasion, reduced management options, and led to the rapid spread of quagga. To reconcile competing mandates to protect nature and provide recreation, zoning in parks has become a common practice worldwide. It reduces stress on some areas of a park by restricting and thus concentrating human activity in particular areas. Concentrating the human activity in one area does three things: cements pathways that repeatedly import and export vectors of non-native invasive species; creates the disturbed area necessary to enable non-native invasive species to gain a foothold; and, establishes a source of invasions that, without appropriate controls, can quickly spread to a park's wilderness areas.
Authors:
Valerie Hickey
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2010-03-22
Journal Detail:
Title:  Conservation biology : the journal of the Society for Conservation Biology     Volume:  24     ISSN:  1523-1739     ISO Abbreviation:  Conserv. Biol.     Publication Date:  2010 Aug 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-07-19     Completed Date:  2010-10-19     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9882301     Medline TA:  Conserv Biol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  931-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA. valerie.hickey@duke.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Bivalvia / physiology*
Conservation of Natural Resources / economics,  methods*
Demography*
Nevada
Population Dynamics
Recreation*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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