Document Detail


Psychometric properties of the Food Thought Suppression Inventory in men.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20522501     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The Food Thought Suppression Inventory (FTSI) recently was validated with an undergraduate female sample. The measure proved to be a highly reliable and valid one-factor measure of food thought suppression. The current study examined the psychometric properties of the FTSI within 289 men. Results suggest that removing one item resulted in a reliable and valid one-factor measure of food thought suppression for men. Similar to the published results with women, the FTSI was related to pathological eating behaviors (e.g. binge eating, compensatory behaviors), and heavier individuals endorsed higher levels of food thought suppression.
Authors:
Rachel D Barnes; Marney A White
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article     Date:  2010-06-03
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of health psychology     Volume:  15     ISSN:  1461-7277     ISO Abbreviation:  J Health Psychol     Publication Date:  2010 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-09-30     Completed Date:  2011-01-27     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9703616     Medline TA:  J Health Psychol     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1113-20     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Program for Obesity, Weight, and Eating Research, Yale University School of Medicine, New haven, CT 06520, USA. rachel.barnes@yale.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Eating Disorders*
Food*
Humans
Male
Obesity
Psychometrics*
Questionnaires / standards*
Young Adult

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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