Document Detail


Psychological risk factors and the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease: findings from the Heart and Soul Study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19969373     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Psychological factors, such as depression and anxiety, are independently associated with an increased risk of both diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, but the reasons for these associations are unknown. We sought to determine whether psychological factors were associated with a greater prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients with coronary heart disease, and the extent to which such an association may be explained by socioeconomic status, health behaviors, and biological mediators. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 1024 outpatients with stable coronary heart disease. Psychological factors, including depressive and anxiety symptoms, hostility, anger, and optimism-pessimism, were assessed using validated standardized questionnaires. The presence or absence of the metabolic syndrome was determined using the criteria outlined by the National Cholesterol Education Program, Adult Treatment Panel III. Higher levels of depression, anger expression, hostility, and pessimism were significantly associated with increased prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. These associations were explained by differences in socioeconomic status and health behaviors. Additional adjustment for potential biological mediators had little impact. Further research is needed to determine whether addressing socioeconomic and behavioral factors in people with depression or high levels of anger or hostility could reduce the burden of the metabolic syndrome.
Authors:
Beth E Cohen; Praveen Panguluri; Beeya Na; Mary A Whooley
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.     Date:  2009-12-06
Journal Detail:
Title:  Psychiatry research     Volume:  175     ISSN:  0165-1781     ISO Abbreviation:  Psychiatry Res     Publication Date:  2010 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-02-01     Completed Date:  2010-03-16     Revised Date:  2014-09-18    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7911385     Medline TA:  Psychiatry Res     Country:  Ireland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  133-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease / epidemiology*,  psychology*
Depression / epidemiology,  psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X / epidemiology*,  psychology*
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychological Tests
Psychology
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Stress, Psychological / epidemiology,  psychology
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K23 HL094765/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL079235/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL079235/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL079235-01A1/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; UL1 RR024130/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
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