Document Detail


Providing accurate safety information may increase a smoker's willingness to use nicotine replacement therapy as part of a quit attempt.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21371825     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
AIM: Previous studies have reported that smokers who are misinformed about the safety of Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) are less likely to report using it. In this study, we examined whether providing information that counters these concerns might impact on intentions to use NRT. PARTICIPANTS: 900 smokers recruited from a market research database. DESIGN AND SETTING: Participants completed an online survey that asked about their views about NRT. Smokers with safety and efficacy concerns were queried to determine whether accurate information might increase their interest in using NRT. FINDINGS: Misperceptions of NRT safety were common: 93% of smokers did not know that smoking while wearing the nicotine patch does not cause heart attacks; 76% that nicotine gum/lozenge are not as addictive as cigarettes; and 69% that NRT products are not as dangerous as cigarettes. Over half of the smokers with misperceptions reported that they would be more likely to use NRT to help them quit smoking if they were exposed to information correcting their concerns (53%, 58% and 66%, respectively, for each of the misperceptions). CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that while a sizeable proportion of smokers are still misinformed about the safety of NRT, misinformed smokers would increase consideration of NRT if these misperceptions are addressed by corrective information.
Authors:
Stuart G Ferguson; Joseph G Gitchell; Saul Shiffman; Mark A Sembower; Jeffrey M Rohay; Jane Allen
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2011-2-13
Journal Detail:
Title:  Addictive behaviors     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1873-6327     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-3-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7603486     Medline TA:  Addict Behav     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Pinney Associates, Pittsburgh, USA; School of Pharmacy, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia; Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia.
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