Document Detail


Protecting embryos from stress: corticosterone effects and the corticosterone response to capture and confinement during pregnancy in a live-bearing lizard (Hoplodactylus maculatus).
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  14636639     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Hormones in the embryonic environment, including those of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, have profound effects on development in eutherian mammals. However, little is known about their effects in reptiles that have independently evolved viviparity. We investigated whether exogenous corticosterone affected embryonic development in the viviparous gecko Hoplodactylus maculatus, and whether pregnant geckos have a corticosterone response to capture and confinement that is suppressed relative to that in non-pregnant (vitellogenic) females and males. Corticosterone implants (5 mg, slow-release) administered to females in mid-pregnancy caused a large elevation of corticosterone in maternal plasma (P<0.001), probable reductions in embryonic growth and development (P=0.069-0.073), developmental abnormalities and eventual abortions. Cool temperature produced similar reductions in embryonic growth and development (P< or =0.036 cf. warm controls), but pregnancies were eventually successful. Despite the potentially harmful effects of elevated plasma corticosterone, pregnant females did not suppress their corticosterone response to capture and confinement relative to vitellogenic females, and both groups of females had higher responses than males. Future research should address whether lower maternal doses of corticosterone produce non-lethal effects on development that could contribute to phenotypic plasticity. Corticosterone implants also led to increased basking in pregnant females (P<0.001), and basal corticosterone in wild geckos (independent of reproductive condition) was positively correlated with body temperature (P<0.001). Interactions between temperature and corticosterone may have broad significance to other terrestrial ectotherms, and body temperature should be considered as a variable influencing plasma corticosterone concentrations in all future studies on reptiles.
Authors:
Alison Cree; Claudine L Tyrrell; Marion R Preest; Dougal Thorburn; Louis J Guillette
Related Documents :
16641539 - Evaluation of a two-generation reproduction toxicity study adding endpoints to detect e...
3688209 - Postcanine tooth size in female primates.
9353799 - Sociogenic stress and rodent reproduction.
4047399 - The importance of central noradrenergic neurones in the formation of an olfactory memor...
7420409 - Characteristics of the menstrual cycle in nonhuman primates. iii. timed mating in macac...
16603679 - Circadian rhythms in murine pups develop in absence of a functional maternal circadian ...
21155689 - Sperm content of pre-ejaculatory fluid.
21585639 - Placental expression of a novel primate-specific splice variant of sflt-1 is upregulate...
20181319 - Obesity in pregnancy.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  General and comparative endocrinology     Volume:  134     ISSN:  0016-6480     ISO Abbreviation:  Gen. Comp. Endocrinol.     Publication Date:  2003 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-11-25     Completed Date:  2004-07-08     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0370735     Medline TA:  Gen Comp Endocrinol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  316-29     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Zoology, University of Otago, Box 56, Dunedin, New Zealand. alison.cree@stonebow.otago.ac.nz
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Animals, Wild
Corticosterone / blood,  pharmacology*
Embryonic Development
Embryonic and Fetal Development / physiology*
Female
Lizards / physiology*
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Animal / physiology*
Stress, Physiological
Temperature
Vitellogenesis
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
50-22-6/Corticosterone

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Gonadotropin regulation of follistatin expression in the cultured ovarian follicle cells of zebrafis...
Next Document:  Effects of steroid hormones on spermatogenesis and GnRH release in male Leopard frogs, Rana pipiens.