Document Detail


Properties of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by a strain of enterobacter isolated from pond water.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11471742     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A bacterium which was isolated from pond water and identified as Enterobacter cloacae produced a viscous extracellular polysaccharide when it was grown aerobically in a medium containing sucrose as a sole source of carbon. The maximum molecular weight of the polysaccharide was about 9.0 x 10(5). The polysaccharide was composed of fucose, galactose, glucose, and glucuronic acid in a molar ratio of 2:3:2:1, but the molecular weight and the molar ratio of the sugar component were different from those of the polysaccharide produced by the same species reported elsewhere.
Authors:
Y Isobe; Y Matsumoto; K Yokoigawa; H Kawai
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Bioscience, biotechnology, and biochemistry     Volume:  65     ISSN:  0916-8451     ISO Abbreviation:  Biosci. Biotechnol. Biochem.     Publication Date:  2001 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-07-26     Completed Date:  2001-12-31     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9205717     Medline TA:  Biosci Biotechnol Biochem     Country:  Japan    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1399-401     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Nara Women's University, Japan. isobe@edu.mie-u.ac.jp
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Chromatography, Gas
Culture Media
Enterobacter / chemistry*
Fresh Water
Hydrolysis
Molecular Weight
Polysaccharides / isolation & purification,  pharmacology*
Viscosity
Water Microbiology*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Culture Media; 0/Polysaccharides

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