Document Detail


Prolonged jaundice in neonates.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22860353     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Process    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Jaundice is common in neonates and is often the reason for a parent to consult a community midwife or health visitor. It is known that up to 40 per cent of breastfed infants are jaundiced at 14 days of age and a proportion of these infants are referred to paediatric services for assessment and blood investigations. Most often the investigations reveal a high bilirubin level but otherwise normal liver function results, leading to a diagnosis of breastfeeding jaundice, with no treatment required other than reassurance to the parents and monitoring. A recent clinical audit is presented which evaluates current clinical practice and the results reflect breast feeding as the main reason for prolonged jaundice. This is followed by some guidance for the community health practitioners with the aim of reducing referral of otherwise well neonates with jaundice and reducing invasive investigations.
Authors:
Siba Prosad Paul; Valerie Hall; Timothy Mackford Taylor
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The practising midwife     Volume:  15     ISSN:  1461-3123     ISO Abbreviation:  Pract Midwife     Publication Date:  2012 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-08-06     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9814758     Medline TA:  Pract Midwife     Country:  England    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  14-7     Citation Subset:  N    
Affiliation:
Great Western Hospital, Swindon.
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