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Progesterone support in IVF: is evidence-based medicine translated to clinical practice? A worldwide web-based survey.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22683150     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This worldwide web-based survey compared the clinical practice for luteal-phase supplementation (LPS) in stimulated IVF cycles to the current evidence-based literature. Eighty-four treatment centres in 35 countries, representing a total of 51,155 IVF cycles/year, responded. Vaginal progesterone alone was used for LPS in 64% of cycles and in another 16% of cycles in combination with either i.m. (15%) or oral progesterone (1%). As a single agent, i.m. progesterone was used in 13% of cycles, oral progesterone in another 2% and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) was still used in 5% of cycles. Progesterone was administered until 10-12weeks' gestation in 67% of cycles and in 22% and 12% it was discontinued when fetal heart pulsations are recognized or until βHCG was positive, respectively. In conclusion, in almost two-thirds of the assisted cycles represented in this survey, vaginal administration of progesterone is preferred for LPS. Nevertheless, despite the available literature on the disadvantages of oral progesterone, i.m. progesterone and HCG for LPS, these agents are still used routinely by many practitioners. Furthermore, although there is no firm evidence to support the continuation of LPS until 10-12weeks' gestation, this practice is used in the majority of IVF cycles worldwide. This worldwide web-based survey assessed the clinical practice for luteal-phase support in stimulated cycles in comparison to the current evidence-based literature. The survey included the following questions: (i) 'What is the progesterone you use for luteal support?'; and (ii) 'How long does progesterone needs to be administered in an IVF cycle if the patient becomes pregnant?'. Eighty-four units from 35 countries representing a total of 51,155 treated IVF cycles/year were included. Vaginal progesterone alone was used for luteal-phase supplementation in 64% of cycles. In another 16% of cycles, vaginal progesterone was used in combination with either intramuscular (15%) or oral progesterone (1%). As a single agent, intramuscular progesterone was used in 13% of cycles, oral progesterone in another 2%, and human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) was still used in 5% of cycles. Progesterone was administered until 10-12weeks' gestation in 67% of cycles, in 22% of cycles it was discontinued when fetal heart pulsations are recognized, and in 12% it was administered until a positive pregnancy test. In conclusion, in agreement with the currently available literature, in almost two-thirds of assisted cycles worldwide, the vaginal route of progesterone administration is preferred for luteal-phase supplementation. Nevertheless, despite the described disadvantages of oral progesterone, intramuscular progesterone and HCG for LPS, these agents are still used routinely in clinical practice by many practitioners. Furthermore, although there is no firm evidence to support the continuation of LPS until 10-12weeks of gestation, this practice is used in the majority of IVF cycles worldwide.
Authors:
Edi Vaisbuch; Milton Leong; Zeev Shoham
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-4-22
Journal Detail:
Title:  Reproductive biomedicine online     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1472-6491     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-6-11     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101122473     Medline TA:  Reprod Biomed Online     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot 76100, Israel.
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