Document Detail


Prism induced accommodation in infants 3 to 6 months of age.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  10820611     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Convergence-accommodation, one of several cross-linkages in the oculomotor system is manifested by opening the accommodative feedback loop and increasing the vergence input. We elicited this response in human infants aged 3-6 months by placing a 15 delta prism (base-out) before one eye while they viewed a diffuse patch of light. Accommodation was measured and ocular alignment was confirmed with a video photorefractor. The convergence-accommodation response is therefore present during a time when blur driven accommodation and disparity vergence are maturing. The gain of convergence-accommodation (expressed as the stimulus CA/C ratio) appeared to be greater for infants than adults.
Authors:
W R Bobier; A Guinta; S Kurtz; H C Howland
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Vision research     Volume:  40     ISSN:  0042-6989     ISO Abbreviation:  Vision Res.     Publication Date:  2000  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2000-06-06     Completed Date:  2000-06-06     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0417402     Medline TA:  Vision Res     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  529-37     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Optometry, University of Waterloo, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Accommodation, Ocular / physiology*
Adult
Aging / physiology*
Convergence, Ocular / physiology*
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Refraction, Ocular
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
EY-02994/EY/NEI NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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