Document Detail


Prevalence and persistence of psychiatric disorders in youth after detention: a prospective longitudinal study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23026953     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
CONTEXT: Psychiatric disorders are prevalent among incarcerated juveniles. Most juveniles eventually return to their communities, where they become the responsibility of the community mental health system. However, no large-scale study has examined psychiatric disorders after youth leave detention.
OBJECTIVE: To examine changes in the prevalence and persistence of psychiatric disorders during the 5 years after detention, focusing on sex and racial/ethnic differences.
DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study with up to 5 interviews (1829 youth: 1172 males and 657 females). To ensure representation of key demographic subgroups, the randomly selected sample was stratified by sex, race/ethnicity (African American, non-Hispanic white, and Hispanic), age, and legal status (juvenile or adult court).
SETTING: The Northwestern Juvenile Project, sampling youth from the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center, Chicago, Illinois.
PARTICIPANTS: Detained youth, aged 10 to 18 years at baseline interview.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At baseline, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version 2.3. At follow-up interviews, the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children Version IV (Child and Young Adult versions) and the Diagnostic Interview Schedule Version IV (substance use disorders and antisocial personality disorder).
RESULTS: Five years after baseline, more than 45% of males and nearly 30% of females had 1 or more psychiatric disorders with associated impairment. More than 50% of males and more than 40% of females had 1 or more psychiatric disorders without impairment. Substance use disorders were the most common; males, however, had higher rates over time (5 years after baseline, adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 2.61; 95% CI, 1.96-3.47). Non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics also had higher rates of substance use disorders vs African Americans (AOR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.54-2.49 and AOR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.24-2.03). Females had higher rates of major depression over time (AOR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.22-2.08).
CONCLUSIONS: Although prevalence rates of most psychiatric disorders declined as youth aged, a substantial proportion of delinquent youth continue to have disorders. There are notable sex and racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence and persistence of psychiatric disorders in this population.
Authors:
Linda A Teplin; Leah J Welty; Karen M Abram; Mina K Dulcan; Jason J Washburn
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Archives of general psychiatry     Volume:  69     ISSN:  1538-3636     ISO Abbreviation:  Arch. Gen. Psychiatry     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-02     Completed Date:  2012-12-13     Revised Date:  2013-10-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372435     Medline TA:  Arch Gen Psychiatry     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1031-43     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Health Disparities and Public Policy, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. healthdisparities@northwestern.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
African Americans / ethnology
Child
European Continental Ancestry Group / ethnology
Female
Hispanic Americans / ethnology
Humans
Illinois / epidemiology
Juvenile Delinquency / ethnology*
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders / epidemiology*
Prevalence
Prisoners / psychology
Prospective Studies
Time Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 DA019380/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA022953/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 DA028763/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01 MH054197/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01 MH059463/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01DA019380/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01DA022953/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01DA028763/DA/NIDA NIH HHS; R01MH54197/MH/NIMH NIH HHS; R01MH59463/MH/NIMH NIH HHS
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