Document Detail


Prevalence of dyslipidemia and general ineffectiveness of its treatment in both primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease within family medicine framework--results of LIPIDOGRAM 2005--a nationwide epidemiological study. Dyslipidemia in Poland--ineffective treatment.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19441674     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: Despite major advances in cardiology dyslipidemia continues to be underdiagnosed and undertreated. The study aimed to evaluate current prevalence of dyslipidemia and treatment efficacy in both coronary and non-coronary subjects. METHODS: 17,065 subjects aged 30-95 years (20.51%--coronary heart disease (CHD) patients), seeking medical help for disparate reasons from 675 family physicians, were randomly enrolled. Family physicians completed pertinent questionnaires against available medical records and measured patients' lipid levels during a single appointment. RESULTS: Dyslipidemia was detected in 73% of the CHD subjects vs. 46% of the non-CHD ones (p = 0.00001); its severity differing regionally. Hypolipemic treatment was administered to 82% of the CHD subjects vs. 12% of the non-CHD ones (p = 0.00001). Mean concentrations of LDL-cholesterol were higher in the treated subjects (p = 0.00002). Only 10% of the CHD subjects and 20% of the non-CHD ones were treated effectively for dyslipidemiae. CONCLUSIONS: Dyslipidemia was found widely prevalent nationwide, as well as poorly pharmacologically controlled in both primary and secondary prevention. Diversity of economic factors notwithstanding, this was mainly attributable to ineffective patient educational policies, meriting therefore immediate expansion and enhancement of existing disease management system in terms of adequate monitoring and effective treatment of key coronary risk factors.
Authors:
Ewa Konduracka; Jacek Jóźwiak; Mirosław Mastej; Witold Lukas; Andrzej Tykarski; Ludwina Szczepaniak-Chicheł; Wiesława Piwowarska
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Przegla̧d lekarski     Volume:  65     ISSN:  0033-2240     ISO Abbreviation:  Prz. Lek.     Publication Date:  2008  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-05-15     Completed Date:  2009-06-18     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  19840720R     Medline TA:  Przegl Lek     Country:  Poland    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  834-7     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Dept. of Coronary Disease, Jagiellonian University School of Medicine, Krakow, Poland. konduracka27@interia.eu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antihypertensive Agents
Antilipemic Agents / therapeutic use
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease / epidemiology*,  prevention & control*
Diabetes Mellitus / epidemiology
Dyslipidemias / drug therapy*,  epidemiology*
Female
Humans
Hypertension / drug therapy,  epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity / epidemiology
Poland / epidemiology
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Smoking / epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Antihypertensive Agents; 0/Antilipemic Agents

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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