Document Detail


Pressure ulcers and prognosis: candid conversations about healing and death.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  18998761     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Patients face the unwelcome diagnosis of pressure ulcers in hospitals and nursing homes around the world. Health care providers impart advice not only about treatment but also about prognosis and expectations. Accurate and informative prognosis at the initial consultation provides a framework for realistic patient expectations about wound healing and potential mortality. Many factors contribute to the prognosis in this multi-component equation. These factors include advancing age, the size and stage of the pressure ulcer, the current nutritional situation, and the chronic disease burden the patient suffers. Patients with pressure ulcers are often frail, resulting in 6-month mortality rates that are often high in this population.
Authors:
Paul Y Takahashi
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Geriatrics     Volume:  63     ISSN:  1936-5764     ISO Abbreviation:  Geriatrics     Publication Date:  2008 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2008-11-12     Completed Date:  2008-12-01     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  2985102R     Medline TA:  Geriatrics     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  6-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Primary Care, Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Kogod Center of Aging, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Aged
Attitude to Death*
Health Services for the Aged / standards
Humans
Pressure Ulcer / mortality*
Wound Healing*
Wound Infection / prevention & control

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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