Document Detail


Preparation of ex vivo-based biomaterials using convective flow decellularization.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19196128     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
With advantageous biomechanical properties, materials derived from ex vivo tissues are being actively investigated as scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. However, decellularization treatments are required before implantation to reduce the materials immune impact. The aim of these investigations was to assess a convective flow model as an enhanced methodology to decellularize ex vivo tissue. Isolated human umbilical veins were decellularized using two methods: rotary agitation at 100rpm on orbital shaker plates, and convective flow run at 5, 50, and 150mmHg within perfusion bioreactors. Extracted phospholipids and total soluble protein were assessed over time. Histology, SEM, and uniaxial tensile testing analysis were carried out to evaluate variation in the tissues. After 72h, samples exposed to traditional rotary agitation showed retention of whole cells and cellular components, whereas pressure-based systems showed no visual sign of cells. The convective flow method was significantly more effective at removing phospholipid and total protein than the agitation model. High transmembrane pressure (150mmHg) resulted in higher phospholipids extraction. However, a more efficient protein extraction occurred at 50mmHg. Variation in extraction rates was dependent on tissue permeability, which varied as pressure increased. Collectively, these findings show significant improvements in decellularization efficiency that may lead to more immune compliant ex vivo-derived biomaterials.
Authors:
Carolina Villegas Montoya; Peter S McFetridge
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Tissue engineering. Part C, Methods     Volume:  15     ISSN:  1937-3392     ISO Abbreviation:  Tissue Eng Part C Methods     Publication Date:  2009 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-07-08     Completed Date:  2009-10-09     Revised Date:  2013-06-02    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101466663     Medline TA:  Tissue Eng Part C Methods     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  191-200     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
School of Chemical, Biological, and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019-1004, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Biocompatible Materials / chemical synthesis*
Cell Separation / methods*
Convection*
Elastic Modulus
Humans
Hydroxyproline / metabolism
Permeability
Phospholipids / isolation & purification
Proteins / isolation & purification
Solubility
Tensile Strength
Tissue Engineering / methods*
Tissue Scaffolds
Umbilical Veins / cytology*,  ultrastructure
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
R01 HL088207-02S1/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Biocompatible Materials; 0/Phospholipids; 0/Proteins; 51-35-4/Hydroxyproline
Comments/Corrections

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