Document Detail


Prenatal malnutrition-induced changes in blood pressure: dissociation of stress and nonstress responses using radiotelemetry.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9674646     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
A link between prenatal malnutrition and hypertension in human populations has recently been proposed. Rat models of prenatal malnutrition have provided major support for this theory on the basis of tail-cuff measurements. However, this technique requires restraint and elevated temperature, both potential sources of stress. To determine the effect of prenatal protein malnutrition on blood pressure under nonstress conditions, 24-hour radiotelemetric measurements were taken in the home cage. Male rats born to dams fed a 6% casein diet for 5 weeks before mating and throughout pregnancy were studied in early adulthood (from 96 days of age). During the waking phase of their cycle but not the sleep phase, prenatal malnutrition gave rise to small but significant elevations of diastolic blood pressure and heart rate compared with well-nourished controls. Direct effects of stress on blood pressure responses were determined in a second experiment using an olfactory stressor. Prenatally malnourished rats showed a greater increase in both systolic and diastolic pressures compared with well-nourished controls during the first exposure to ammonia. A different pattern of change of cardiovascular responses was also observed during subsequent presentations of the stressor. These findings of a small baseline increase in diastolic pressure consequent to prenatal malnutrition, but an augmented elevation of both systolic and diastolic pressures after first exposure to stress, suggest the need to reevaluate interpretation of the large elevations in blood pressure previously observed in malnourished animals using the stressful tail-cuff procedure.
Authors:
J Tonkiss; M Trzcińska; J R Galler; N Ruiz-Opazo; V L Herrera
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Hypertension     Volume:  32     ISSN:  0194-911X     ISO Abbreviation:  Hypertension     Publication Date:  1998 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1998-07-31     Completed Date:  1998-07-31     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7906255     Medline TA:  Hypertension     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  108-14     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Center for Behavioral Development and Mental Retardation, Boston University School of Medicine, Mass 02118, USA. jtonkiss@bu.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age Factors
Ammonia / adverse effects
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Blood Pressure / physiology*
Blood Pressure Monitors
Darkness
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation / complications*
Heart Rate
Hypertension / etiology*
Light
Male
Odors
Pregnancy
Protein-Energy Malnutrition / complications*
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Stress, Physiological / complications*,  etiology
Telemetry
Time Factors
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HD22539/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HL48903/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
7664-41-7/Ammonia

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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