Document Detail


Prenatal exposure to traffic pollution: associations with reduced fetal growth and rapid infant weight gain.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  25437317     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Prenatal air pollution exposure inhibits fetal growth, but implications for postnatal growth are unknown.
METHODS: We assessed weights and lengths of US infants in the Project Viva cohort at birth and 6 months. We estimated 3rd-trimester residential air pollution exposures using spatiotemporal models. We estimated neighborhood traffic density and roadway proximity at birth address using geographic information systems. We performed linear and logistic regression adjusted for sociodemographic variables, fetal growth, and gestational age at birth.
RESULTS: Mean birth weight-for-gestational age z-score (fetal growth) was 0.17 (standard deviation [SD] = 0.97; n = 2,114), 0- to 6-month weight-for-length gain was 0.23 z-units (SD = 1.11; n = 689), and 17% had weight-for-length ≥95th percentile at 6 months of age. Infants exposed to the highest (vs. lowest) quartile of neighborhood traffic density had lower fetal growth (-0.13 units [95% confidence interval (CI) = -0.25 to -0.01]), more rapid 0- to 6-month weight-for-length gain (0.25 units [95% CI = 0.01 to 0.49]), and higher odds of weight-for-length ≥95th percentile at 6 months (1.84 [95% CI = 1.11 to 3.05]). Neighborhood traffic density was additionally associated with an infant being in both the lowest quartile of fetal growth and the highest quartile of 0- to 6-month weight-for-length gain (Q4 vs. Q1, odds ratio = 3.01 [95% CI = 1.08 to 8.44]). Roadway proximity and 3rd-trimester black carbon exposure were similarly associated with growth outcomes. For 3rd-trimester particulate matter (PM2.5), effect estimates were in the same direction, but smaller and imprecise.
CONCLUSIONS: Infants exposed to higher traffic-related pollution in early life may exhibit more rapid postnatal weight gain in addition to reduced fetal growth.
Authors:
Abby F Fleisch; Sheryl L Rifas-Shiman; Petros Koutrakis; Joel D Schwartz; Itai Kloog; Steven Melly; Brent A Coull; Antonella Zanobetti; Matthew W Gillman; Diane R Gold; Emily Oken
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.)     Volume:  26     ISSN:  1531-5487     ISO Abbreviation:  Epidemiology     Publication Date:  2015 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-12-02     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  2014-12-09    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9009644     Medline TA:  Epidemiology     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  43-50     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K12 DK094721/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; K24 HD069408/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; P01 ES009825/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; P30 DK092924/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; P30 ES000002/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; T32 HL007427/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS

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