Document Detail


Prenatal exposure to mercury and infant neurodevelopment in a multicenter cohort in Spain: study of potential modifiers.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22287639     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Vulnerability of the central nervous system to mercury is increased during early development. This study aimed to evaluate whether cord blood total mercury levels may have a negative effect on both mental and psychomotor development in a maternal-birth cohort from moderate-high fish consumption areas. Study subjects were 1,683 child participants in the INMA (Environment and Childhood) Project from 4 areas of Spain between 2003 and 2010. Cord blood total mercury levels were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry. Infant neurodevelopment was assessed around age 14 months by the Bayley Scales of Infant Development. Sociodemographic, lifestyle, and dietary information was obtained by questionnaire during pregnancy. The geometric mean of total mercury levels was 8.4 μg/L (95% confidence interval (CI): 8.1, 8.7). In multivariate analysis, a doubling in total mercury levels did not show an association with mental (β = 0.1, 95% CI: -0.68, 0.88) or psychomotor (β = -0.05, 95% CI: -0.79, 0.68) developmental delay; however, stratified findings by sex suggest a negative association between prenatal exposure to total mercury and psychomotor development among female infants (β = -1.09, 95% CI: -2.21, 0.03), although follow-up is required to confirm these results.
Authors:
Sabrina Llop; Mònica Guxens; Mario Murcia; Aitana Lertxundi; Rosa Ramon; Isolina Riaño; Marisa Rebagliato; Jesus Ibarluzea; Adonina Tardon; Jordi Sunyer; Ferran Ballester;
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-01-27
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of epidemiology     Volume:  175     ISSN:  1476-6256     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Epidemiol.     Publication Date:  2012 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-02-21     Completed Date:  2012-05-22     Revised Date:  2013-01-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7910653     Medline TA:  Am J Epidemiol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  451-65     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Centre for Public Health Research, Valencia, Spain. llop_sab@gva.es
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Cohort Studies
Developmental Disabilities / blood,  chemically induced*
Diet Surveys
Effect Modifier, Epidemiologic
Female
Fetal Blood / chemistry*
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Mercury / blood,  toxicity*
Multivariate Analysis
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects / blood,  chemically induced*
Psychological Tests
Psychomotor Disorders / blood,  chemically induced*
Psychomotor Performance / drug effects
Seafood
Sex Factors
Spain
Water Pollutants, Chemical / blood,  toxicity*
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Water Pollutants, Chemical; 7439-97-6/Mercury
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Am J Epidemiol. 2012 Dec 15;176(12):1194-5; author reply 1195-6   [PMID:  23161896 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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