Document Detail


Pregravid body mass index is associated with early introduction of complementary foods.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22939440     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether women who entered pregnancy overweight or obese were less likely to follow American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines for introducing complementary foods to infants after 4 months of age. In addition, we explored whether psychological factors accounted for any of the effect of pregravid body mass index on age of complementary food introduction.
DESIGN: A prospective cohort study from 2001 to 2005 that recruited pregnant women between 15 to 20 gestational weeks with follow-up through 12 months postpartum from University of North Carolina hospitals (n=550).
STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Multinomial models were used to estimate relative risk ratios. The outcome was age of complementary food introduction, categorized as younger than 4 months of age, 4 to 6 months, and 6 months or later (referent). Maternal body mass index was categorized as underweight (<18.5), normal weight (18.5 to 24.9), and overweight/obese (≥25). A series of regression analyses tested mediation by psychological factors measured during pregnancy (depressive symptoms, stress, and anxiety).
RESULTS: More than a third of the study population (35.7% of 550) entered pregnancy overweight/obese. The majority of participants (75.3%) introduced foods to their infants between 4 and 6 months of age. Compared with normal-weight women, those who were overweight/obese before pregnancy were more likely (relative risk ratios=2.22 [95% CI 1.23 to 4.01]) to introduce complementary foods before the infant was 4 months old, adjusting for race, education, and poverty status. Depressive symptoms, stress, and anxiety did not account for any of the effect of pregravid overweight/obesity on early food introduction.
CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that overweight and obese women are more likely to introduce complementary foods early and that psychological factors during pregnancy do not influence this relationship. Future studies need to explore why overweight/obese women are less likely to meet the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations for the introduction of complementary food.
Authors:
Ushma J Mehta; Anna Maria Siega-Riz; Amy H Herring; Linda S Adair; Margaret E Bentley
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics     Volume:  112     ISSN:  2212-2672     ISO Abbreviation:  J Acad Nutr Diet     Publication Date:  2012 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-09-03     Completed Date:  2012-11-01     Revised Date:  2013-09-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101573920     Medline TA:  J Acad Nutr Diet     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1374-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7461, USA. umehta1231@gmail.com
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Age Factors
Body Mass Index*
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Care / psychology*
Infant Food*
Infant Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Male
Maternal Behavior / psychology*
Mothers / psychology*,  statistics & numerical data
North Carolina
Obesity / psychology
Overweight / psychology*
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Stress, Psychological
Time Factors
Weaning
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DK56350/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; DK61981/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; HD37584/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; HD39373/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; P30 DK056350/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 DK061981/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; R01 HD037584/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD039373/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R24 HD050924/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
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