Document Detail


Preconditioning reaches clinical practice in intracranial arterial stenosis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23035070     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Symptomatic atherosclerotic intracranial arterial stenosis is a common etiologic mechanism of ischemic stroke. Patients with intracranial arterial stenosis carry a high risk of recurrent stroke that persists even with aggressive preventive measures.(1) The growing popularity of endovascular interventions for intracranial arterial stenosis, such as percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS), has spurred hope that such an approach might reduce stroke recurrence and the substantial resulting morbidity. While not without its controversies, the recently presented results of the SAMMPRIS study (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00576693), a randomized controlled trial comparing aggressive medical management to PTAS in patients with intracranial arterial stenosis and recent stroke or TIA, found that PTAS might actually increase the risk of stroke recurrence.(2) Consequently, a demand endures for alternative therapies to reduce recurrent stroke risk in intracranial arterial stenosis.
Authors:
Brad E Zacharia; Samuel S Bruce; Turgut Tatlisumak
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-10-3
Journal Detail:
Title:  Neurology     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1526-632X     ISO Abbreviation:  Neurology     Publication Date:  2012 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-10-4     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0401060     Medline TA:  Neurology     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
From the Department of Neurological Surgery (B.Z., S.B.), Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY; and Department of Neurology (T.T.), Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Growth failure and outcome in Rett syndrome: specific growth references.
Next Document:  Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: An MRI-based scheme for epilepsy surgery.