Document Detail


Premenopausal and postmenopausal differences in bone microstructure and mechanical competence in Chinese-American and white women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23299863     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Compared to white women, premenopausal Chinese-American women have more plate-like trabecular (Tb) bone. It is unclear whether these findings are relevant to postmenopausal women and if there are racial differences in the deterioration of bone microarchitecture with aging. We applied individual trabecula segmentation and finite element analysis to high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography images in premenopausal and postmenopausal Chinese-American and white women to quantify within-race age-related differences in Tb plate-versus-rod microarchitecture and bone stiffness. Race-menopause status interactions were assessed. Comparisons between races within menopause status were adjusted for age, height and weight. Comparisons between premenopausal and postmenopausal women were adjusted for height and weight. Adjusted analyses at the radius indicated that premenopausal Chinese-Americans had a higher plate bone volume fraction (pBV/TV), Tb plate-to-rod ratio (P-R ratio), and greater plate-plate junction densities (P-P Junc.D) versus white women (all p < 0.01), resulting in 27% higher Tb stiffness (p < 0.05). Greater cortical thickness and density (Ct.Th and Dcort) and more Tb plates led to 19% greater whole bone stiffness (p < 0.05). Postmenopausal Chinese-Americans had similar pBV/TV and P-P Junc.D, yet a higher P-R ratio versus white women. Postmenopausal Chinese-American versus white women had greater Ct.Th, Dcort, and relatively intact Tb plates, resulting in similar Tb stiffness but 12% greater whole bone stiffness (p < 0.05). In both races, Ct.Th and Dcort were lower in postmenopausal versus premenopausal women and there were no differences between races. Tb plate parameters were also lower in postmenopausal versus premenopausal women, but age-related differences in pBV/TV, P-R ratio, and P-P Junc D were greater (p < 0.05) in Chinese-Americans versus white women. There are advantages in cortical and Tb bone in premenopausal Chinese-American women. Within-race cross-sectional differences between premenopausal and postmenopausal women suggest greater loss of plate-like Tb bone with aging in Chinese-Americans, though thicker cortices and more plate-like Tb bone persists.
Authors:
Marcella D Walker; X Sherry Liu; Bin Zhou; Shivani Agarwal; George Liu; Donald J McMahon; John P Bilezikian; X Edward Guo
Related Documents :
20047693 - Citation analysis of orthopaedic literature; 18 major orthopaedic journals compared for...
15158093 - Population-based study of lymphoma in germany: rationale, study design and first results.
23538783 - Acquired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction in the lower a...
Publication Detail:
Type:  Clinical Trial; Comparative Study; Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research     Volume:  28     ISSN:  1523-4681     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Bone Miner. Res.     Publication Date:  2013 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-05-22     Completed Date:  2013-12-09     Revised Date:  2014-06-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8610640     Medline TA:  J Bone Miner Res     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1308-18     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Aging / metabolism,  pathology
Asian Americans*
Body Height
Body Weight
Bone Density*
Bone and Bones* / metabolism,  pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
European Continental Ancestry Group*
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Postmenopause / metabolism*
Premenopause / metabolism*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K23 AR053507/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; K23 AR053507/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; R01 AR051376/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; R01 AR051376/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; R01 AR058004/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Obesity might not be a disadvantage for SWL treatment in children with renal stone.
Next Document:  Bioelectrical impedance validation studies: alternative approaches to their interpretation.