Document Detail


Postneonatal mortality surveillance--United States, 1980-1994.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  9665157     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PROBLEM/CONDITION: This report contains public health surveillance data that describe trends in postneonatal mortality (PNM) and that update information published in 1991.
REPORTING PERIOD COVERED: 1980-1994.
DESCRIPTION OF SYSTEM: National death certificate data characterizing PNM were reported by hospital physicians, coroners, and medical examiners. Data for 1980-1994 were compiled by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and obtained from NCHS public-use mortality tapes.
RESULTS: The PNM rate per 1,000 live births declined 29.8% from 4.1 in 1980 to 2.9 in 1994 (31.7% decline among white infants and 25.8% among black). Most of the decline resulted from reduced mortality from infections and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The PNM ratio between blacks and whites remained steady at approximately 2.1 during 1982-1988 and gradually increased to 2.4 by 1994 [corrected]. Autopsy rates for cases of SIDS increased from 82% to approximately 95% and did not differ among black infants and white infants. The decline of PNM rates for birth defects was greater for white infants than for black infants. The racial gap in PNM rates widened regionally during the study period, except in the South and the Northeast where ratios remained stable. In 1994, the largest gap persisted in the north-central region followed by the West and Northeast.
INTERPRETATION: In 1994 as in 1980, PNM remained an important contributor to infant mortality, but nearly half of these deaths are caused by potentially preventable causes such as SIDS, infections, and injuries. The use of interventions for SIDS, birth defects, infections, and injuries can help reduce PNM and narrow the associated racial gap.
ACTIONS TAKEN: This surveillance information, which will be distributed to administrators of state maternal and child health programs and to community-based organizations nationwide, will be useful in planning infant mortality reduction programs and to target PNM prevention efforts.
Authors:
C L Scott; S Iyasu; D Rowley; H K Atrash
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  MMWR. CDC surveillance summaries : Morbidity and mortality weekly report. CDC surveillance summaries / Centers for Disease Control     Volume:  47     ISSN:  -     ISO Abbreviation:  MMWR CDC Surveill Summ     Publication Date:  1998 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1998-07-21     Completed Date:  1998-07-21     Revised Date:  2012-03-29    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8407977     Medline TA:  MMWR CDC Surveill Summ     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  15-30     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
African Americans / statistics & numerical data
Congenital Abnormalities / mortality
European Continental Ancestry Group / statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant Mortality / trends*
Infant, Newborn
Infection / mortality
Sudden Infant Death / epidemiology
United States / epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries / mortality
Comments/Corrections
Erratum In:
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 1998 Jul 10;47(26):555

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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