Document Detail


Pneumothorax and cerebral haemorrhage in preterm infants.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  6110043     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Real-time ultrasound was used to examine the brains of all 95 infants born at less than 33 weeks of gestation who were admitted to the neonatal unit of University College Hospital in 1979. Evidence was obtained which strongly suggested that pneumothorax causes and aggravates haemorrhage into the germinal layer and ventricles of preterm infants.
Authors:
A P Lipscomb; R J Thorburn; E O Reynolds; A L Stewart; R J Blackwell; G Cusick; M D Whitehead
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Lancet     Volume:  1     ISSN:  0140-6736     ISO Abbreviation:  Lancet     Publication Date:  1981 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1981-04-13     Completed Date:  1981-04-13     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  2985213R     Medline TA:  Lancet     Country:  ENGLAND    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  414-6     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Carbon Dioxide / blood
Cerebral Hemorrhage / etiology*,  physiopathology
Female
Gestational Age
Hemodynamics
Humans
Hyaline Membrane Disease / therapy
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases*
Male
Oxygen / blood
Pneumothorax / complications*
Respiration, Artificial
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
124-38-9/Carbon Dioxide; 7782-44-7/Oxygen

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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