Document Detail


Pica and the elephant's ear.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  12585730     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This is a case report of an otherwise healthy 2-year-old boy with a history of pica, associated with iron deficiency anemia. This boy was referred to our department for a neurologic evaluation because of an acute episode of sialorrhea, difficulty in speaking, dysphagia, and repeated swallowing movements. An uncertain episode of a brief-duration still gaze was also reported. In addition, the history revealed that the child had earlier ingested a leaf from a poisonous houseplant called Colocasia esculenta, also known as "elephant's ear." The habit of pica subsided after treatment with iron supplements. A 9-month follow-up period was uneventful. Neurologic manifestations can accompany accidental intoxications of some non-nutrient substances. Thus, pica must be suspected in children with acute behavior alterations.
Authors:
Helen Mihailidou; Emmanouil Galanakis; Penelope Paspalaki; Pelagia Borgia; Evangelia Mantzouranis
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of child neurology     Volume:  17     ISSN:  0883-0738     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Child Neurol.     Publication Date:  2002 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2003-02-14     Completed Date:  2003-05-02     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8606714     Medline TA:  J Child Neurol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  855-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University General Hospital, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. miheni@med.uoc.gr
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Anemia, Iron-Deficiency / complications,  drug therapy
Aphasia / chemically induced
Child, Preschool
Colocasia*
Deglutition Disorders / chemically induced
Humans
Iron / therapeutic use
Male
Pica / complications*
Plant Poisoning / complications*
Sialorrhea / chemically induced
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
7439-89-6/Iron

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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