Document Detail


Physiologic responses of competitive canadian cross-country skiers with disabilities.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22222595     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To examine the acute cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses in competitive cross-country skiers with disabilities.
DESIGN: Cross-sectional comparisons using a select group of Canadian athletes training for the Vancouver 2010 Paralympic Winter Games.
SETTING: Canmore Nordic Centre Provincial Park, Canmore, Alberta.
PARTICIPANTS: Nine competitive cross-country skiers (4 with visual impairment, 1 with traumatic brain injury, 3 with spinal cord injury, and 1 with cerebral palsy).
INTERVENTIONS: Three-minute and 12-minute exercise tests in the standing or sitting skiing position to voluntary fatigue.
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cardiorespiratory responses using a telemetric system to compare the physiologic responses among the athletes with different disabilities. Heart rate (HR) and capillary lactate were measured at 2, 5, and 10 minutes of recovery.
RESULTS: The t test results indicated that the peak values of the absolute and relative oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak), HR, and ventilation rate were significantly higher during the 12-minute compared with the 3-minute protocol during standing skiing. However, the oxygen pulse and ventilatory equivalent for oxygen ratio were not significantly (P > 0.05) different between the 2 protocols. Analysis of variance revealed no significant (P > 0.05) differences among the 3 trials for these peak physiologic responses during sitting skiing. Cross-sectional comparisons of the peak physiologic responses between the standing and sitting skiers indicated significantly (P < 0.05) higher values in the standing compared with the sitting position. Cardiorespiratory respiratory efficiency was significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the sitting compared with the standing position. HR during 10 minutes of recovery was significantly correlated with V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak. Pearson correlations were not significant between V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and lactate removal during recovery.
CONCLUSION: These descriptive findings during the standing and sitting skiing protocols provide preliminary data that would be useful in testing, training, and classification of competitive skiers with disabilities.
Authors:
Yagesh Bhambhani; Scott Forbes; Janet Forbes; Bruce Craven; Cristiane Matsuura; Carol Rodgers
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical journal of sport medicine : official journal of the Canadian Academy of Sport Medicine     Volume:  22     ISSN:  1536-3724     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin J Sport Med     Publication Date:  2012 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-01-09     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9103300     Medline TA:  Clin J Sport Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  31-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
*Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine †Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada ‡Sports Medicine Council of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada §Army School of Physical Education, Brazilian Army, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil ¶College of Kinesiology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
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