Document Detail


Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of halofuginone (NSC 713205) in CD2F1 mice and Fischer 344 rats.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11761455     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: Halofuginone (HF) inhibits synthesis of collagen type I and matrix metalloproteinase-2 and is being considered for clinical evaluation as an antineoplastic agent. Pharmacokinetic studies were performed in rodents to define the plasma pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and urinary excretion of HF after i.v. delivery and the bioavailability of HF after i.p. and oral delivery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Studies were performed in CD2F1 mice and Fischer 344 rats. In preliminary toxicity studies in mice single HF i.v. bolus doses between 1.0 and 5.0 mg/kg were used. Pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in mice after administration of 1.5 mg/kg HF. In preliminary toxicity studies in male rats HF i.v. bolus doses between 0.75 and 4.5 mg/kg were used. In pharmacokinetic studies in rats an HF dose of 3.0 mg/kg was used. Compartmental and non-compartmental analyses were applied to the plasma concentration versus time data. Plasma, red blood cells, various organs, and urine were collected for analysis. RESULTS: HF doses > or = 1.5 mg/kg proved excessively toxic to mice. In mice, i.v. bolus delivery of 1.5 mg/kg HF produced "peak" plasma HF concentrations between 313 and 386 ng/ml, and an AUC of 19,874 ng/ml min, which corresponded to a total body clearance (CLtb) of 75 ml/min per kg. Plasma HF concentration versus time data were best fit by a two-compartment open linear model. The bioavailability of HF after i.p. and oral delivery to mice was 100% and 0%, respectively. After i.v. bolus delivery to mice, HF distributed rapidly to all tissues, except brain. HF persisted in lung, liver, kidney, spleen, and skeletal muscle longer than in plasma. In the oral study, HF was undetectable in plasma and red blood cells, but was easily detectable in kidney, liver, and lung, and persisted in those tissues for 48 h. Urinary excretion of HF accounted for 7-11% of the administered dose within the first 72 h after i.v. dosing and 15-16% and 16% of the administered dose within 24 and 48 h, respectively, after oral dosing. There were no observed metabolites of HF in mouse plasma or tissues. In rats, i.v. bolus delivery of 3.0 mg/kg produced a "peak" plasma HF concentration of 348 ng/ml, and an AUC of 43,946 ng/ml min, which corresponded to a CLtb of 68 ml/min per kg. Plasma HF concentration versus time data were best fit by a two-compartment open linear model. After i.v. bolus delivery to rats, HF distributed rapidly to all tissues, with low concentrations detectable in brain and testes. HF was detectable in some tissues for up to 48 h. HF could be detected in rat plasma after a 3 mg/kg oral dose. Peak HF concentration (34 ng/ml) occurred at 90 min, but HF concentrations were less than the lower limit of quantitation (LLQ) by 420 min. Urinary excretion of HF accounted for 8-11% of the administered dose within the first 48 h after i.v. dosing. No HF metabolites were detected in plasma, tissue, or urine. CONCLUSIONS: HF was rapidly and widely distributed to rodent tissues and was not converted to detectable metabolites. In mice, HF was 100% bioavailable when given i.p. but could not be detected in plasma after oral administration, suggesting limited oral bioavailability. However, substantial concentrations were present in liver, kidney, and lungs. HF was present in rat plasma after an oral dose, but the time course and low concentrations achieved precluded reliable estimation of bioavailability. These data may assist in designing and interpreting additional preclinical and clinical studies of HF.
Authors:
K P Stecklair; D R Hamburger; M J Egorin; R A Parise; J M Covey; J L Eiseman
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Cancer chemotherapy and pharmacology     Volume:  48     ISSN:  0344-5704     ISO Abbreviation:  Cancer Chemother. Pharmacol.     Publication Date:  2001 Nov 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-12-11     Completed Date:  2001-12-28     Revised Date:  2007-11-14    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7806519     Medline TA:  Cancer Chemother Pharmacol     Country:  Germany    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  375-82     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Molecular Therapeutics/Drug Discovery Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, PA 15213, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Antineoplastic Agents / pharmacokinetics*
Blood Proteins / metabolism
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Male
Mice
Piperidines
Protein Binding
Quinazolines / pharmacokinetics*
Quinazolinones
Rats
Rats, Inbred F344
Tissue Distribution
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
2P30 CA47904/CA/NCI NIH HHS; N01-CM07106/CM/NCI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Antineoplastic Agents; 0/Blood Proteins; 0/Piperidines; 0/Quinazolines; 0/Quinazolinones; 17395-31-2/halofuginone

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