Document Detail


Persistent beneficial effects of breast milk ingested in the neonatal intensive care unit on outcomes of extremely low birth weight infants at 30 months of age.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  17908750     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: We previously reported beneficial effects of breast milk ingestion by infants with extremely low birth weight in the NICU on developmental outcomes at 18 months' corrected age. The objective of this study was to determine whether these effects of breast milk in infants with extremely low birth weight persisted at 30 months' corrected age. METHODS: Nutrition data, including enteral and parenteral feeds, were prospectively collected, and 30 months' corrected age follow-up assessments were completed on 773 infants with extremely low birth weight who participated in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research Network Glutamine Trial. A total of 593 ingested some breast milk during the neonatal hospitalization, and 180 ingested none. Neonatal feeding characteristics and morbidities and 30-month interim history, neurodevelopmental outcomes, and growth parameters were analyzed. Children were divided into quintiles of breast milk volume to evaluate the effects of volume of human milk ingested during the NICU hospitalization. RESULTS: At 30 months, increased ingestion of breast milk was associated with higher Bayley Mental Developmental Index scores, higher Bayley behavior score percentiles for emotional regulation, and fewer rehospitalizations between discharge and 30 months. There were no differences in growth parameters or cerebral palsy. For every 10 mL/kg per day increase in breast milk, the Mental Developmental Index increased by 0.59 points, the Psychomotor Developmental Index by 0.56 points, and the total behavior percentile score by 0.99 points, and the risk of rehospitalization between discharge and 30 months decreased by 5%. CONCLUSIONS: Beneficial effects of ingestion of breast milk in the NICU persist at 30 months' corrected age in this vulnerable extremely low birth weight population. Continued efforts must be made to offer breast milk to all extremely low birth weight infants both in the NICU and after discharge.
Authors:
Betty R Vohr; Brenda B Poindexter; Anna M Dusick; Leslie T McKinley; Rosemary D Higgins; John C Langer; W Kenneth Poole;
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Multicenter Study; Randomized Controlled Trial; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Pediatrics     Volume:  120     ISSN:  1098-4275     ISO Abbreviation:  Pediatrics     Publication Date:  2007 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2007-10-02     Completed Date:  2007-10-29     Revised Date:  2007-12-03    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376422     Medline TA:  Pediatrics     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  e953-9     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, Brown Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. betty_vohr@brown.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Child Development*
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Extremely Low Birth Weight*
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal*
Milk, Human*
Neuropsychological Tests
Patient Readmission / statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
M01 RR 00070/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR 00750/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR 06022/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; M01 RR 08084/RR/NCRR NIH HHS; U01 HD36790/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21364/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21385/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD21397/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27851/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27853/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27856/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27871/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27880/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD27904/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD34216/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD40461/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; U10 HD40689/HD/NICHD NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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