Document Detail


Perceptions of junior doctors in the NHS about their training: results of a regional questionnaire.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22282817     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
ObjectiveTo explore the views of doctors in training about their current roles and their potential value to the National Health Service (NHS) in improving healthcare quality and productivity.MethodsOnline questionnaire sent via email to 3766 junior doctors (foundation year one to specialist trainee year 3+) in the NHS South Central region.ResultsThe response rate was 1479/3766 (39.3%). Respondents recognised the importance of leadership (89.7%), team working (89.2%) and professionalism (97%). Only 3.4% of junior doctors stated they have never acted in a leadership capacity. However, respondents reported a lack of receptivity from their organisations: the majority responded that they do not feel valued by managers (83.3%), the chief executive (77.7%), the organisation (77.3%), the NHS (79.3%) and consultants (58.2%). 91.2% of respondents have had ideas for improvement in their workplace; however, only 10.7% have had their ideas for change implemented. Respondents who had been on a NHS South Central leadership development course were significantly more likely to feel valued by all groups of staff in their organisation. They were also significantly more likely to report having their ideas implemented.ConclusionsDoctors in training have a desire and perceived ability to contribute to improvement in the NHS but do not perceive their working environment as receptive to their skills. Junior doctors who attend leadership training report higher levels of desire and ability to express these skills. This study suggests junior doctors are an untapped NHS resource and that they and their organisations would benefit from more formalised provision of training in leadership.
Authors:
Alexandra Gilbert; Peter Hockey; Rhema Vaithianathan; Nick Curzen; Peter Lees
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Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE     Date:  2012-1-25
Journal Detail:
Title:  BMJ quality & safety     Volume:  -     ISSN:  2044-5423     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2012 Jan 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-1-27     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101546984     Medline TA:  BMJ Qual Saf     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical Oncology, St James's University Hospital, Beckett Street, Leeds, UK.
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