Document Detail


Perceived discrimination and blood pressure in older African American and white adults.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  19429703     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: The current study was designed to examine the cross-sectional association between perceived discrimination and blood pressure (BP) in a sample of older African American and white adults. We hypothesized that perceived discrimination would be associated with higher levels of BP and that this association would be stronger for older African Americans compared with whites.
METHODS: Participants were 4,694 (60% African American, 60% women) community-dwelling older adults. Perceived discrimination and other relevant risk factors were assessed via interview, and BP was measured using standard sphygmomanometers. Multivariate linear regression models were conducted to test associations among race, perceived discrimination, and BP.
RESULTS: In models adjusted for age, sex, race, and education, perceived discrimination was not associated with higher levels of systolic blood pressure (p=.10) but was associated with higher levels of diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (p=.01). Further analyses revealed that the association between perceived discrimination and DBP was present in older African Americans (p=.0003) but not whites (p=.46). Results persisted after adjusting for relevant risk factors.
CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest that discrimination may be a unique risk factor for elevated DBP in older African Americans. Because these findings are cross-sectional, additional research is needed to determine whether the observed associations persist over time.
Authors:
Tené T Lewis; Lisa L Barnes; Julia L Bienias; Daniel T Lackland; Denis A Evans; Carlos F Mendes de Leon
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2009-05-08
Journal Detail:
Title:  The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences     Volume:  64     ISSN:  1758-535X     ISO Abbreviation:  J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.     Publication Date:  2009 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2009-08-05     Completed Date:  2009-08-25     Revised Date:  2014-09-05    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9502837     Medline TA:  J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1002-8     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
African Americans / psychology*
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Pressure*
European Continental Ancestry Group / psychology*
Female
Humans
Hypertension / ethnology*
Linear Models
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prejudice*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
AG11101/AG/NIA NIH HHS; HL092591/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; K01 HL092591/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; K01 HL092591-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
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