Document Detail


Pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage: acute symptomatic seizures and epilepsy.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23392319     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
IMPORTANCE: Seizures are believed to be common presenting symptoms in neonates and children with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, few data are available on the epidemiology of acute symptomatic seizures or the risk for later epilepsy.
OBJECTIVE: To define the incidence of and explore risk factors for seizures and epilepsy in children with spontaneous ICH. Our a priori hypotheses were that younger age at presentation, cortical involvement of ICH, acute symptomatic seizures after presentation, ICH due to vascular malformation, and elevated intracranial pressure requiring urgent intervention would predict remote symptomatic seizures and epilepsy.
DESIGN: Prospective cohort study conducted between March 1, 2007, and January 1, 2012.
SETTING: Three tertiary care pediatric hospitals.
PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-three pediatric subjects with spontaneous ICH including 20 perinatal (≥37 weeks' gestation to 28 days) and 53 childhood subjects (>28 days to <18 years at presentation).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Acute symptomatic seizures (clinically evident and electrographic-only seizures within 7 days), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy.
RESULTS: Acute symptomatic seizures occurred in 35 subjects (48%). Acute symptomatic seizures as a presenting symptom of ICH occurred in 12 perinatal (60%) and 19 childhood (36%) subjects (P = .07). Acute symptomatic seizures after presentation occurred in 7 children. Electrographic-only seizures were present in 9 of 32 subjects (28%) with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring. One-year and 2-year remote symptomatic seizure-free survival rates were 82% (95% CI, 68-90) and 67% (95% CI, 46-82), respectively. One-year and 2-year epilepsy-free survival rates were 96% (95% CI, 83-99) and 87% (95% CI, 65-95), respectively. Elevated intracranial pressure requiring acute intervention was a risk factor for seizures after presentation (P = .01; Fisher exact test), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy (P = .03, and P = .04, respectively; log-rank test).
CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Presenting seizures are common in perinatal and childhood ICH. Continuous electroencephalography may detect electrographic seizures in some subjects. Single remote symptomatic seizures occur in many, and development of epilepsy is estimated to occur in 13% of patients at 2 years. Elevated intracranial pressure requiring acute intervention is a risk factor for acute seizures after presentation, remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy.
Authors:
Lauren A Beslow; Nicholas S Abend; Melissa C Gindville; Rachel A Bastian; Daniel J Licht; Sabrina E Smith; Argye E Hillis; Rebecca N Ichord; Lori C Jordan
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  JAMA neurology     Volume:  70     ISSN:  2168-6157     ISO Abbreviation:  JAMA Neurol     Publication Date:  2013 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-04-09     Completed Date:  2013-05-31     Revised Date:  2014-04-02    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101589536     Medline TA:  JAMA Neurol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  448-54     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anticonvulsants / therapeutic use
Cerebral Hemorrhage / epidemiology*,  mortality,  radiography
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy / drug therapy,  epidemiology*,  mortality,  radiography
Female
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Risk Factors
Seizures / drug therapy,  epidemiology*,  mortality,  radiography
Statistics, Nonparametric
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
K12 NS049453/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; K12-NS049453/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; K23 NS062110/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; K23 NS076550/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; K23-NS062110/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; K23-NS076550/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS050488/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01 NS072338/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01-NS050488/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; R01-NS072338/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; T32 NS007413/NS/NINDS NIH HHS; T32-NS007413/NS/NINDS NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Anticonvulsants
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
JAMA Neurol. 2013 Apr;70(4):437   [PMID:  23392342 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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