Document Detail


Patterns and predictors of vaginal bleeding in the first trimester of pregnancy.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20538195     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: Although first-trimester vaginal bleeding is an alarming symptom, few studies have investigated the prevalence and predictors of early bleeding. This study characterizes first trimester bleeding, setting aside bleeding that occurs at time of miscarriage.
METHODS: Participants (n = 4539) were women ages 18 to 45 enrolled in Right From the Start, a community-based pregnancy study (2000-2008). Bleeding information included timing, heaviness, duration, color, and associated pain. Life table analyses were used to describe gestational timing of bleeding. Factors associated with bleeding were investigated by the use of multiple logistic regression with multiple imputation for missing data.
RESULTS: Approximately one fourth of participants (n = 1207) reported bleeding (n = 1656 episodes), but only 8% of women with bleeding reported heavy bleeding. Of the spotting and light bleeding episodes (n = 1555), 28% were associated with pain. Among heavy episodes (n = 100), 54% were associated with pain. Most episodes lasted less than 3 days, and most occurred between gestational weeks 5 to 8. Twelve percent of women with bleeding and 13% of those without experienced miscarriage. Maternal characteristics associated with bleeding included fibroids and prior miscarriage.
CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the hypothesis that bleeding is a marker for placental dysfunction, bleeding is most likely to be observed around the time of the luteal-placental shift.
Authors:
Reem Hasan; Donna D Baird; Amy H Herring; Andrew F Olshan; Michele L Jonsson Funk; Katherine E Hartmann
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Annals of epidemiology     Volume:  20     ISSN:  1873-2585     ISO Abbreviation:  Ann Epidemiol     Publication Date:  2010 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-06-11     Completed Date:  2010-09-22     Revised Date:  2014-09-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9100013     Medline TA:  Ann Epidemiol     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  524-31     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Abortion, Spontaneous / epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Confidence Intervals
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Leiomyoma / complications,  epidemiology
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First*
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Socioeconomic Factors
United States / epidemiology
Uterine Hemorrhage / epidemiology*,  etiology
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
5R01HD043883/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; 5R01HD049675/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; NIH0013475679//PHS HHS; P30 ES010126/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; P30ES10126/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS; R01 HD043883/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD043883-05/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD049675/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R01 HD049675-01A1/HD/NICHD NIH HHS; R24 HD050924-07/HD/NICHD NIH HHS
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From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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