Document Detail


Pattern and consequences of first visits to obstetricians/gynecologists by adolescents: a nationwide study in Taiwan.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  20230999     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
BACKGROUND: Some adolescents have special health care needs. Privacy concerns, unawareness or ethnical/cultural factors are barriers to women visiting obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/GYNs). The utilization of OB/GYN services by adolescent girls is seldom reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern and consequences of first visits to OB/GYNs by adolescent girls within the National Health Insurance in Taiwan. METHODS: From the 1-million cohort dataset of the National Health Insurance Research Database spanning from 1996 to 2007, adolescent girls visiting OB/GYNs for the first time were identified. The characteristics of first visits were analyzed. Their follow-up visits and admissions within 1 year after their first visits to OB/GYNs were traced. RESULTS: In 2006, only 5.8% (n = 2,682) of 46,582 adolescent girls in our study cohort had their first visits to OB/GYNs: 46.7% with diagnoses of menstrual disorders and 14.8% with diagnoses related to inflammatory or infectious diseases of the genital organs. The examination most frequently ordered was pregnancy test (for 19.9% of these first visits). Very few (0.4%) first visits were for preventive services. Among the infrequent admissions (85 admissions of 75 girls) to obstetric/gynecology wards within 1 year after first visits, the majority (74 of 85 admissions) were pregnancy-related. CONCLUSION: The leading motivating factor for first visits to OB/GYNs by adolescent girls was menstrual disorders. The majority of subsequent admissions were pregnancy-related, indicating that adolescent pregnancy deserves further attention.
Authors:
Hsiao-Yun Yeh; Yu-Chun Chen; Irene Su; Li-Fang Chou; Hsiang-Tai Chao; Tzeng-Ji Chen; Shinn-Jang Hwang
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of the Chinese Medical Association : JCMA     Volume:  73     ISSN:  1728-7731     ISO Abbreviation:  J Chin Med Assoc     Publication Date:  2010 Mar 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2010-03-16     Completed Date:  2010-06-04     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101174817     Medline TA:  J Chin Med Assoc     Country:  China (Republic : 1949- )    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  144-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
Copyright Information:
Copyright 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Affiliation:
Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Female
Gynecology*
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Menstruation Disturbances*
Obstetrics*
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence*
Taiwan
Young Adult
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
J Chin Med Assoc. 2010 Apr;73(4):186-7   [PMID:  20457438 ]

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