Document Detail


Patient decision making in the face of conflicting medication information.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22943889     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
When patients consult more than one source of information about their medications, they may encounter conflicting information. Although conflicting information has been associated with negative outcomes, including worse medication adherence, little is known about how patients make health decisions when they receive conflicting information. The objective of this study was to explore the decision making strategies that individuals with arthritis use when they receive conflicting medication information. Qualitative telephone interviews were conducted with 20 men and women with arthritis. Interview vignettes posed scenarios involving conflicting information from different sources (e.g., doctor, pharmacist, and relative), and respondents were asked how they would respond to the situation. Data analysis involved inductive coding to identify emergent themes and deductive contextualization to make meaning from the emergent themes. In response to conflicting medication information, patients used rules of thumb, trial and error, weighed benefits and risks, and sought more information, especially from a doctor. Patients relied heavily on trial and error when there was no conflicting information involved in the vignette. In contrast, patients used rules of thumb as a unique response to conflicting information. These findings increase our understanding of what patients do when they receive conflicting medication information. Given that patient exposure to conflicting information is likely to increase alongside the proliferation of medication information on the Internet, patients may benefit from assistance in identifying the most appropriate decision strategies for dealing with conflicting information, including information about best information sources.
Authors:
Emily Elstad; Delesha M Carpenter; Robert F Devellis; Susan J Blalock
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2012-08-28
Journal Detail:
Title:  International journal of qualitative studies on health and well-being     Volume:  7     ISSN:  1748-2631     ISO Abbreviation:  Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being     Publication Date:  2012  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-09-04     Completed Date:  2013-06-13     Revised Date:  2013-07-12    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101256506     Medline TA:  Int J Qual Stud Health Well-being     Country:  Sweden    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  1-11     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. elstad@live.unc.edu
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthritis / drug therapy
Communication
Conflict (Psychology)*
Cross-Sectional Studies
Decision Making*
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Male
Medication Adherence*
Middle Aged
Patient Medication Knowledge*
Patients
Pharmacists
Qualitative Research
Risk Assessment
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
5T32-AR007416/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS; UL1RR025747/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Comments/Corrections

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