Document Detail


Patient behavior if given their surgeon's cellular telephone number.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16205168     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Technologic advances in communications potentially may affect the patient-doctor relationship. We assessed call patterns, reasons for calling, and attitudes if patients had their surgeon's cellular telephone number, to determine if there are potential benefits to this practice. Postoperative calls made by patients to the surgeon, secretary, and surgical scheduler were categorized as urgent or nonurgent. Twenty of 32 (63%) consecutive patients made 65 calls during a 2-month period. Only 12 calls (18%) were to the surgeon. Fifty percent were urgent, as opposed to 14% and 15% of calls to the secretary and surgical scheduler, respectively. Subsequently, 201 patients were prospectively administered a 10-question survey assessing patient attitudes if given direct access to their surgeon. Eighty percent owned a cellular telephone, 85% would call the surgeon, and 30% would prefer the surgeon as the first line of communication. Communicating through E-mail or home phone was less desirable than through the nurse or cellular telephone. Seventy-two percent thought that having cellular telephone access suggested that their surgeon was more caring. Patients desired to communicate directly with surgeons, but act with restraint and call as a last resort for mostly urgent issues if given the physician's cellular telephone number. The cellular telephone has promising benefits for the patient-physician relationship.
Authors:
Kingsley R Chin; Samuel B Adams; Lisa Khoury; David Zurakowski
Related Documents :
17595178 - Differences between physicians in the likelihood of referral and acceptance of elderly ...
17171688 - Use of complementary and alternative medicine in children with cancer in occidental, me...
20871128 - How well do patient reports reflect adverse drug reactions reported by rheumatologists?...
16962218 - Information seeking during "bad news" oncology interactions: question asking by patient...
10071918 - Osteoporosis in adult patients with celiac disease.
22048928 - Neuroleptic-induced catatonia in two hospitalized patients.
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical orthopaedics and related research     Volume:  439     ISSN:  0009-921X     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.     Publication Date:  2005 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-10-05     Completed Date:  2005-12-15     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0075674     Medline TA:  Clin Orthop Relat Res     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  260-8     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Spine Surgery, Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. kingsleychin@hotmail.com
Export Citation:
APA/MLA Format     Download EndNote     Download BibTex
MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Aged
Cellular Phone*
Data Collection
Female
Health Behavior
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Orthopedics*
Patients / psychology*
Physician-Patient Relations*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


Previous Document:  Orthopaedic techniques of Sabuncuoğlu in the 15th century Ottoman period.
Next Document:  CASE REPORTS: malignant fibrous histiocytoma of bone arising in chronic osteomyelitis.