Document Detail


Parental attachment, drug use, and facultative sexual strategies.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7481923     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
It is often asserted that sexual promiscuity and drug abuse appears to share a common etiology in poor parental attachment. This study explores this claim empirically among 480 college students. Other variables--religiosity, masculinity/femininity, sex, age, and physical appearance--that may enhance or reduce the incidence of promiscuity and drug use were included in multivariate analyses. Parental attachment was significantly related to both variables, and the combination of poor parental attachment and drug use was a strong predictor of promiscuity for both males and females. In multivariate analyses, religiosity was the most important predictor of promiscuity for males, and attachment was the most important for females. The findings are examined guided by the three desiderata commonly accepted as relevant to biosocial attachment theory.
Authors:
A Walsh
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Social biology     Volume:  42     ISSN:  0037-766X     ISO Abbreviation:  Soc Biol     Publication Date:    1995 Spring-Summer
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1995-12-01     Completed Date:  1995-12-01     Revised Date:  2004-11-17    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0205621     Medline TA:  Soc Biol     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  95-107     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Criminal Justice Administration, Boise State University, Idaho 83725, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Incidence
Male
Object Attachment*
Parent-Child Relations*
Personality Assessment
Risk Factors
Sexual Behavior*
Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology*,  psychology

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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