Document Detail


PTSD, Attention Bias, and Heart Rate After Severe Brain Injury.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22231318     Owner:  NLM     Status:  In-Data-Review    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Does "partial" posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occur after head injury? The authors found that attention bias to trauma-related threat stimuli and higher heart rate during trauma interview were not associated with PTSD symptom severity in 42 participants with severe head injury. They found no evidence for "partial" PTSD.
Authors:
Louise M Reid; Thomas M McMillan; Andrew G Harrison
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences     Volume:  23     ISSN:  1545-7222     ISO Abbreviation:  J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci     Publication Date:  2011 Sep 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2012-01-10     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8911344     Medline TA:  J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  454-6     Citation Subset:  IM    
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