Document Detail


Oxygen tension assessment: an overlooked tool for prediction of delayed healing in a clinical setting.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  21914132     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Successful wound healing requires adequate transcutaneous oxygen tension (tcpO(2) ). TcpO(2) may not commonly be incorporated in clinical assessments because of variable measurement response at different sensory temperatures. This study aims to assess the relationship between changes in tcpO(2) , measured under basal (39°C) and stimulated (44°C) conditions and healing rate of chronic wounds over 4 weeks, to determine whether tcpO(2) measurement can predict delayed wound healing. TcpO(2) (Radiometer TCM400) measurements at sensor temperatures 39 and 44°C were recorded (twice, 4 weeks apart) adjacent to the ulcer site, and at a mirror image site on the contralateral leg. Ulcer outline was traced on clear acetate and perimeter and area measured (Visitrak™, Smith and Nephew). TcpO(2) measured at 44 and 39°C adjacent to all 13 wounds were lower compared to the contralateral site, significant at 44°C (P = 0·008). Significant correlation (r(2) = 0·8) occurred between wound healing rate and increased tcpO(2) at 44°C over 4 weeks. Importantly, the ratio of 39/44°C tcpO(2) , measured at the initial appointment, appeared to predict normal or delayed healing rate. TcpO(2) may provide clinicians with information regarding anticipated healing ability of wounds at the initial appointment, and hence identify wounds requiring early implementation of adjuvant therapies to accelerate healing.
Authors:
Rajna Ogrin; Michael Woodward; Geoff Sussman; Zeinab Khalil
Publication Detail:
Type:  JOURNAL ARTICLE    
Journal Detail:
Title:  International wound journal     Volume:  8     ISSN:  1742-481X     ISO Abbreviation:  -     Publication Date:  2011 Oct 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-9-14     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  101230907     Medline TA:  Int Wound J     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  437-445     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
© 2011 The Authors. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.
Affiliation:
R Ogrin, PhD, Endocrine Centre of Excellence, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Austin Health Heidelberg, Melbourne, Australia, School of Physical Therapy, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada M Woodward, MD, Wound Management Service, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Melbourne, Australia G Sussman, BPHARM, Wound Management Service, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Melbourne, Australia Z Khalil, PhD, Endocrine Centre of Excellence, Heidelberg Repatriation Hospital, Austin Health Heidelberg, Melbourne, Australia, Oceania University of Medicine Samoa, National Health Complex, Motootua, Apia, Samoa.
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