Document Detail


Ovarian cycle and sympathoexcitation in premenopausal women.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  23172932     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The influence of the ovarian cycle on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) remains controversial. Some studies report an increase of resting MSNA during the mid luteal (ML) phase of the ovarian cycle compared with the early follicular phase, whereas other studies do not. These inconsistent findings may be attributable, in part, to the variable surges in estradiol and progesterone. We tested the hypothesis that the degree of sympathoexcitation during the ML phase (ΔMSNA) is associated with changes in estradiol (ΔE(2)) and progesterone (ΔP). Multiple regression analysis of data from previous studies with complete recordings of mean arterial pressure, MSNA, E(2), and P during both early follicular and ML phases were available from 30 eumenorrheic women (age, 28 ± 1 years; body mass index, 23 ± 0 kg/m(2)). ML phase increased E(2) (37 ± 2 to 117 ± 9 pg/mL; P<0.001), P (1 ± 0 to 11 ± 1 ng/mL; P<0.001), and MSNA (12 ± 1 to 15 ± 1 bursts/min; P=0.02), but did not alter mean arterial pressure (83 ± 2 to 83 ± 2 mm Hg; P=0.91). ΔMSNA was correlated with ΔE(2) (r=-0.50, P=0.003) and ΔE(2)/ΔP (r=-0.52, P=0.002) but not ΔP (r=0.21, P=0.13). There was no association between Δmean arterial pressure and ΔE(2) (r=-0.13, P=0.49), ΔP (r=-0.04, P=0.83), or ΔE(2)/ΔP (r<0.01, P=0.98). In conclusion, sympathoexcitation during the ML phase of the ovarian cycle seems to be dependent, in part, on the degree of sex steroid surges. This dynamic interaction among E(2), P, and MSNA likely explains previously reported inconsistencies in the field; it remains possible that other sex steroids, such as testosterone, might explain further variance.
Authors:
Jason R Carter; Qi Fu; Christopher T Minson; Michael J Joyner
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2012-11-19
Journal Detail:
Title:  Hypertension     Volume:  61     ISSN:  1524-4563     ISO Abbreviation:  Hypertension     Publication Date:  2013 Feb 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2013-01-17     Completed Date:  2013-03-20     Revised Date:  2014-02-04    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  7906255     Medline TA:  Hypertension     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  395-9     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Blood Pressure / physiology
Body Mass Index
Estradiol / blood
Female
Heart Rate / physiology
Humans
Menstrual Cycle / physiology*
Premenopause / physiology*
Progesterone / blood
Retrospective Studies
Sympathetic Nervous System / physiology*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL-075283/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; HL-081671/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; HL-083947/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; HL-088689/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; K23 HL075283/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL081671/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL083947/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R21 HL098676/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
4G7DS2Q64Y/Progesterone; 4TI98Z838E/Estradiol
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Hypertension. 2013 Apr;61(4):e36   [PMID:  23460281 ]
Hypertension. 2013 Apr;61(4):e37   [PMID:  23607137 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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