Document Detail


Outcomes of Arthroscopic Anterior Shoulder Instability in the Beach Chair Versus Lateral Decubitus Position: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  25000864     Owner:  NLM     Status:  Publisher    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: This study aimed to systematically review the clinical outcomes and recurrence rates after arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization in the beach chair (BC) and lateral decubitus (LD) positions.
METHODS: The authors performed a systematic review of multiple medical databases using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. All English-language literature from 1990 to 2013 reporting clinical outcomes after arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization with suture anchors or tacks with a minimum 2-year follow-up period were reviewed by 2 independent reviewers. Data on recurrent instability rate, return to activity/sport, range of motion, and subjective outcome measures were collected. Study methodological quality was evaluated with the Modified Coleman Methodology Score (MCMS) and the Quality Appraisal Tool (QAT). To quantify the structured review of observational data, meta-analytic statistical methods were used.
RESULTS: Sixty-four studies (38 BC position, 26 LD position) met inclusion criteria. A total of 3,668 shoulders were included, with 2,211 of patients in the BC position (average age, 26.7 ± 3.8 years; 84.5% male sex) and 1,457 patients in the LD position (average age, 26.0 ± 3.0 years; 82.7% male sex). The average follow-up was 49.8 ± 29.5 months in the BC group compared with 38.7 ± 23.3 months in the LD group. Average overall recurrent instability rates were 14.65 ± 8.4% in the BC group (range, 0% to 38%) compared with 8.5% ± 7.1% in the LD group (range, 0% to 30%; P = .002). The average postoperative loss in external rotation motion (in abduction) was reported in 19 studies in the BC group and in13 studies in the LD group, with an average loss of 2.4° ± 1.0° and 3.6° ± 2.6° in each group, respectively (P > .05).
CONCLUSIONS: Excellent clinical outcomes with low recurrence rates can be obtained after arthroscopic anterior shoulder stabilization in either the BC or the LD position; however, lower recurrence rates are noted in the LD position. Additional long-term randomized clinical trials comparing these positions are needed to better understand the potential advantages and disadvantages of each position.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, systematic review of studies with Level I through Level IV evidence.
Authors:
Rachel M Frank; Maristella F Saccomanno; Lucas S McDonald; Mario Moric; Anthony A Romeo; Matthew T Provencher
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Publication Detail:
Type:  REVIEW     Date:  2014-7-4
Journal Detail:
Title:  Arthroscopy : the journal of arthroscopic & related surgery : official publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association     Volume:  -     ISSN:  1526-3231     ISO Abbreviation:  Arthroscopy     Publication Date:  2014 Jul 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2014-7-8     Completed Date:  -     Revised Date:  -    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8506498     Medline TA:  Arthroscopy     Country:  -    
Other Details:
Languages:  ENG     Pagination:  -     Citation Subset:  -    
Copyright Information:
Copyright © 2014 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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