Document Detail


Occupational mobility and carotid artery intima-media thickness: findings from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  22021461     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a 10-year change in occupational standing is related to carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) 5 years later.
METHODS: Data were obtained from 2350 participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. Occupational standing was measured at the Year 5 and 15 CARDIA follow-up examinations when participants were 30.2 (standard deviation = 3.6) and 40.2 (standard deviation = 3.6) years of age, respectively. IMT (common carotid artery [CCA], internal carotid artery [ICA], and bulb) was measured at Year 20. Occupational mobility was defined as the change in occupational standing between Years 5 and 15 using two semicontinuous variables. Analyses controlled for demographics, CARDIA center, employment status, parents' medical history, own medical history, Year 5 Framingham Risk Score, physiological risk factors and health behaviors averaged across the follow-up, and sonography reader.
RESULTS: Occupational mobility was unrelated to IMT save for an unexpected association of downward mobility with less CCA-IMT (β = -0.04, p = .04). However, associations differed depending on initial standing (Year 5) and sex. For those with lower initial standings, upward mobility was associated with less CCA-IMT (β = -0.07, p = .003), and downward mobility was associated with greater CCA-IMT and bulb-ICA-IMT (β = 0.14, p = .01 and β = 0.14, p = .03, respectively); for those with higher standings, upward mobility was associated with greater CCA-IMT (β = 0.15, p = .008), but downward mobility was unrelated to either IMT measure (p values > .20). Sex-specific analyses revealed associations of upward mobility with less CCA-IMT and bulb-ICA-IMT among men only (p values < .02).
CONCLUSIONS: Occupational mobility may have implications for future cardiovascular health. Effects may differ depending on initial occupational standing and sex.
Authors:
Denise Janicki-Deverts; Sheldon Cohen; Karen A Matthews; David R Jacobs; Nancy E Adler
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't     Date:  2011-10-21
Journal Detail:
Title:  Psychosomatic medicine     Volume:  73     ISSN:  1534-7796     ISO Abbreviation:  Psychosom Med     Publication Date:    2011 Nov-Dec
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2011-11-08     Completed Date:  2012-02-17     Revised Date:  2014-09-19    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0376505     Medline TA:  Psychosom Med     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  795-802     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases / epidemiology*
Career Mobility*
Carotid Arteries / pathology*,  ultrasonography
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness / statistics & numerical data*
Demography
Employment / statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Models, Statistical
Risk Factors
Sex Factors
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Tunica Intima / pathology*,  ultrasonography
Tunica Media / pathology*,  ultrasonography
Young Adult
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
HL076852/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-45204/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48047/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48048/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48049/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-48050/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; N01-HC-95095/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL095296/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01 HL095296-01A1/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R01-HL095296-01/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; R24HL076858/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS
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