Document Detail


Occult spinal dysraphism in the infant.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  8665744     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The progressive neurologic dysfunction caused by occult spinal dysraphism can be prevented with early clinical recognition, radiographic diagnosis, and neurosurgical treatment. However, detection of occult spinal dysraphism in the infant is difficult because neurologic symptoms often are not apparent until the child becomes ambulatory. Occult spinal dysraphism, however, can be suspected in the asymptomatic neonate when cutaneous stigmata, such as hemangiomas, hairy patches, deep and/or eccentric dimples, or subcutaneous masses are seen over the lumbosacral spine. Because of the serious, often irreversible, sequelae of a delayed diagnosis, spinal sonography of high-risk infants with midline, lumbosacral, cutaneous stigmata should be considered as an effective, noninvasive screening method.
Authors:
V M Kriss; T C Kriss; N S Desai; B C Warf
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Clinical pediatrics     Volume:  34     ISSN:  0009-9228     ISO Abbreviation:  Clin Pediatr (Phila)     Publication Date:  1995 Dec 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1996-08-07     Completed Date:  1996-08-07     Revised Date:  2005-11-16    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  0372606     Medline TA:  Clin Pediatr (Phila)     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  650-4     Citation Subset:  AIM; IM    
Affiliation:
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington 40536-0084, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Humans
Infant
Spina Bifida Occulta / pathology*,  radiography,  surgery,  ultrasonography*
Spinal Cord / abnormalities,  pathology,  surgery
Spine / abnormalities,  pathology,  surgery
Comments/Corrections
Comment In:
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1995 Dec;34(12):655-6   [PMID:  8665745 ]

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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