Document Detail


O2 uptake and work by in situ muscle performing contractions with constant shortening.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  7219132     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
The oxygen uptake by the gastrocnemius-plantaris muscle group of the dog was measured during brief submaximal isotonic-tetanic contractions. Shortening in the contractions was kept constant while the load was altered by adjusting the stimulation voltage applied to the motor nerve. Incompletely fused tetanic contractions were produced by 200 msec trains of impulses at a frequency of 20/sec. The trains were delivered once a second. The rate of oxygen uptake (VO2) was linearly related to the external work rate (W). The relationship between VO2, microliter/g min, vs W, gM/g min, is described by the equation VO2 = 18.0 + 3.36 W. The average maximal gross efficiency was 12.5%. The major determinant of VO2 during contractions appeared to be the number of muscle fibers which were activated during the contractions.
Authors:
W N Stainsby; C V Peterson; R W Barbee
Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Medicine and science in sports and exercise     Volume:  13     ISSN:  0195-9131     ISO Abbreviation:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Publication Date:  1981  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  1981-06-25     Completed Date:  1981-06-25     Revised Date:  2008-11-21    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8005433     Medline TA:  Med Sci Sports Exerc     Country:  UNITED STATES    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  27-30     Citation Subset:  IM; S    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Animals
Dogs
Electric Stimulation
Female
Male
Muscle Contraction*
Muscles / physiology*
Oxygen Consumption*
Physical Exertion*

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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