Document Detail


Novel associations of giant cell myocarditis: two case reports and a review of the literature.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  15100760     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Giant cell myocarditis (GCM) is a rare and frequently fatal disorder with no proven treatment. It is a disease of young, predominantly healthy adults. Without transplantation, patients usually die of heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Due to the poor prognosis of the condition, prompt recognition and diagnosis are of clinical importance. Approximately 19% of these cases are associated with autoimmune diseases. The present article describes two unique cases of GCM associated with autoimmune diseases not previously reported in the literature - discoid lupus erythematosis and autoimmune hepatitis. A review of the natural history and treatment of GCM is also presented.
Authors:
Salima Shariff; Lynn Straatman; Michael Allard; Andrew Ignaszewski
Publication Detail:
Type:  Case Reports; Journal Article; Review    
Journal Detail:
Title:  The Canadian journal of cardiology     Volume:  20     ISSN:  0828-282X     ISO Abbreviation:  Can J Cardiol     Publication Date:  2004 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2004-04-21     Completed Date:  2004-05-27     Revised Date:  2008-04-09    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8510280     Medline TA:  Can J Cardiol     Country:  Canada    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  557-61     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Division of Cardiology, Saint Paul's Hospital and The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Autoimmune Diseases / complications,  diagnosis*
Diagnosis, Differential
Dyspnea / etiology
Electrocardiography
Granuloma, Giant Cell / complications,  diagnosis*,  pathology
Humans
Lupus Erythematosus, Discoid / complications,  diagnosis*
Male
Middle Aged
Myocarditis / complications,  diagnosis*,  pathology

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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