Document Detail


North Carolina dental hygienists' assessment of patients' tobacco and alcohol use.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  16197766     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
PURPOSE: North Carolina is the 11th most populous state and ranks 14th among all states in the age-adjusted mortality rate for oral and pharyngeal cancer (OPC). This study assessed North Carolina dental Hygienists' knowledge of tobacco and alcohol use as OPC risk factors, assessment practices of tobacco and alcohol use in patient medical histories, and opinions regarding tobacco and alcohol cessation education. Characteristics of dental hygienists who screen for tobacco and alcohol use in medical histories were also analyzed. METHODS: A 40-item survey was mailed to a simple random sample of 1,223 dental hygienists from a registry of 4,076 licensed in North Carolina. Data were included from 651 completed surveys, giving an effective response rate of 57%. RESULTS: Most respondents correctly identified tobacco and alcohol use as risk factors for OPC. A majority assessed patients' tobacco and alcohol use. Less than 10% assessed no tobacco factors, while nearly 42% assessed no alcohol factors. A number of background and practice characteristics were found to be positively associated with tobacco and alcohol screening in patient medical histories. A majority agreed or strongly agreed that dental hygienists should be trained to provide tobacco and alcohol cessation education to their patients; however, few felt trained to provide such education. CONCLUSION: Improvements in knowledge regarding tobacco and alcohol use as OPC risk factors are needed. Future interventions might include educational programs for currently practicing dental hygienists and increased tobacco and alcohol cessation education in the professional entry-level dental hygiene curricula.
Authors:
Tanya E Ashe; John R Elter; Janet H Southerland; Ronald P Strauss; Lauren L Patton
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural     Date:  2005-04-01
Journal Detail:
Title:  Journal of dental hygiene : JDH / American Dental Hygienists' Association     Volume:  79     ISSN:  1553-0205     ISO Abbreviation:  J Dent Hyg     Publication Date:  2005  
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2005-10-03     Completed Date:  2006-02-15     Revised Date:  2007-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  8902616     Medline TA:  J Dent Hyg     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  9     Citation Subset:  D    
Affiliation:
Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, USA.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adult
Alcohol Drinking / adverse effects
Alcohol-Related Disorders / complications,  diagnosis*
Dental Hygienists / education*,  psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Medical History Taking
Middle Aged
Mouth Neoplasms / etiology
Multivariate Analysis
North Carolina
Patient Education as Topic
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment
Sampling Studies
Tobacco / adverse effects
Tobacco Use Cessation
Tobacco Use Disorder / complications,  diagnosis*
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DE 14413/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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