Document Detail


No effect of seasonal variation in training load on immuno-endocrine responses to acute exhaustive exercise.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11374427     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
This study was designed to examine the relationship between seasonal changes in training and competition load, and changes in leukocyte subsets, stress hormones, and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in response to a standardised bout of endurance exercise. In addition, changes in mood states were monitored. Ten male, international Nordic skiers, age 20-29, maximal oxygen uptake 70-82 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1) performed the same incremental treadmill tests to exhaustion at the same time of day (+/-1 h), during the competitive season (in-season HI test) and the recovery season (off-season LO test). The subject filled out a training and competition log (TC score) for three weeks prior to each test and a 65-item Profile of Mood State (POMS) test on arrival at the laboratory. Venous blood for haematological, hormonal, and IL-6 analysis was drawn before and at 0, 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 min after the test. TC score was more than twice as high during the competitive season (16.0 +/- 3.9) compared to the off-season period (7.0 +/- 4.4). An ANOVA procedure for repeated measures showed no difference in exercise induced changes in concentrations of neutrocytes, lymphocytes, epinephrine, ACTH or cortisol between the in-season HI and off-season LO tests; however, norepinephrine and the IL-6 concentrations were elevated at the in-season HI test compared to the off-season LO test. There were no significant differences in POMS global mood score or sub-scores between the in-season HI and the off-season LO tests. Thus, in a group of elite Nordic skiers, we conclude that a doubling of the training and competition load during the winter season does not alter the leukocyte and stress hormone responses to an incremental exercise test to exhaustion.
Authors:
O Ronsen; K Holm; H Staff; P K Opstad; B K Pedersen; R Bahr
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't    
Journal Detail:
Title:  Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports     Volume:  11     ISSN:  0905-7188     ISO Abbreviation:  Scand J Med Sci Sports     Publication Date:  2001 Jun 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2001-05-25     Completed Date:  2001-09-27     Revised Date:  2006-11-15    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  9111504     Medline TA:  Scand J Med Sci Sports     Country:  Denmark    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  141-8     Citation Subset:  IM    
Affiliation:
Norwegian National Sports Center, Oslo.
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adaptation, Physiological / physiology
Adaptation, Psychological
Adrenal Cortex Hormones / blood
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone / blood
Adult
Endocrine System / physiology*
Exercise / physiology*,  psychology
Humans
Immune System / physiology*
Interleukin-6 / blood
Leukocytes / metabolism
Male
Neutrophils / metabolism
Physical Education and Training / methods*
Seasons*
Skiing / physiology*,  psychology
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Adrenal Cortex Hormones; 0/Interleukin-6; 9002-60-2/Adrenocorticotropic Hormone

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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