Document Detail


No effect of menstrual cycle phase on glucose kinetics and fuel oxidation during moderate-intensity exercise.
MedLine Citation:
PMID:  11882494     Owner:  NLM     Status:  MEDLINE    
Abstract/OtherAbstract:
Resting and exercise fuel metabolism was assessed in three different phases of the menstrual cycle, characterized by different levels of estrogen relative to progesterone: early follicular (EF, low estrogen and progesterone), midfollicular (MF, elevated estrogen, low progesterone), and midluteal (ML, elevated estrogen and progesterone). It was hypothesized that exercise glucose utilization and whole body carbohydrate oxidation would decrease sequentially from the EF to the MF to the ML phase. Normal-weight healthy females, experiencing a regular menstrual cycle, were recruited. Subjects were moderately active but not highly trained. Testing occurred after 3 days of diet control and after an overnight fast (12-13 h). Resting (2 h) and exercise (50% maximal O(2) uptake, 90 min) measurements of whole body substrate oxidation, tracer-determined glucose flux, and substrate and hormone concentrations were made. No significant difference was observed in whole body fuel oxidation during exercise in the three phases (nonprotein respiratory exchange ratio: EF 0.84 +/- 0.01, MF 0.85 +/- 0.01, ML 0.85 +/- 0.01) or in rates of glucose appearance or disappearance. There were, however, significantly higher glucose (P < 0.05) and insulin (P < 0.001) concentrations during the first 45 min of exercise in the ML phase vs. EF and MF phases. In conclusion, whole body substrate oxidation and glucose utilization did not vary significantly across the menstrual cycle in moderately active women, either at rest or during 90 min of moderate-intensity exercise. During the ML phase, however, this similar pattern of substrate utilization was associated with greater glucose and insulin concentrations. Both estrogen and progesterone are elevated during the ML phase of the menstrual cycle, suggesting that one or both of these sex steroids may play a role in this response.
Authors:
Tracy J Horton; Emily K Miller; Deborah Glueck; Kathleen Tench
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Publication Detail:
Type:  Journal Article; Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.    
Journal Detail:
Title:  American journal of physiology. Endocrinology and metabolism     Volume:  282     ISSN:  0193-1849     ISO Abbreviation:  Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab.     Publication Date:  2002 Apr 
Date Detail:
Created Date:  2002-03-07     Completed Date:  2002-04-08     Revised Date:  2014-09-05    
Medline Journal Info:
Nlm Unique ID:  100901226     Medline TA:  Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab     Country:  United States    
Other Details:
Languages:  eng     Pagination:  E752-62     Citation Subset:  IM    
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MeSH Terms
Descriptor/Qualifier:
Adolescent
Adult
Basal Metabolism
Blood Glucose / metabolism*
Body Composition
Energy Metabolism*
Estrogens / blood
Exercise*
Fasting
Female
Follicular Phase / physiology
Heart Rate
Humans
Insulin / blood
Kinetics
Luteal Phase / physiology
Menstrual Cycle / physiology*
Oxidation-Reduction
Oxygen Consumption
Progesterone / blood
Grant Support
ID/Acronym/Agency:
DK48520/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS; HL04226/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; HL59331/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS; K07 CA088811/CA/NCI NIH HHS; K07 CA088811-01A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS; K07 CA088811-02/CA/NCI NIH HHS; M01-RR-00051/RR/NCRR NIH HHS
Chemical
Reg. No./Substance:
0/Blood Glucose; 0/Estrogens; 0/Insulin; 4G7DS2Q64Y/Progesterone
Comments/Corrections

From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine


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